HANDCRAFTED HISTORY


Leave a comment

Medieval pattens (research post)

I wanted to buy myself a pair of really nice wooden pattens to protect my handmade medieval shoes during events, like 6 years ago. I didn’t find any, so then I tried to trade for a pair with some woodworking friends, but non knew how to make a pair or didn’t want to, so I set out to fix my non-pattens-problem on my own. That took a while; and believe me, I have gone through some bad options before I ended up happy.

patinor

Making a wooden sole with a leather strap, and then put it on your foot seems like a simple task, but in the end I didn’t get it right before I researched the extant finds, looked at artwork and then tried making a pair with some serious hands-on experimenting. I wanted them to both look good, feel right and be comfortable to move in. Now I have finally made a pair I am satisfied with, so I wanted to share my research and process with you! Because of the amount of research, text and pictures I ended up with, I am splitting the posts into research and step-by-step. Easier to read!

Period: Europe, mainly 14th to 15th century.

About pattens

Pattens are a pair of soles with straps, to wear with your everyday medieval shoe to raise the foot above the ground, avoiding snow, dirt and water. Though they might look like sandals their purpose was to protect the wearer and the expensive shoes all year around, and the thick soles meant you came up from the ground, keeping you dry and warm as well as making the shoes last longer. Pattens were shaped after the foot and the leather shoe, changing form as the shoe fashion did.

They may also be referred to as clogs or galoshes, all names for a medieval overshoe meant to protect the leather shoe, though I will use the term pattens like Grew and Neergaard does in Shoes and Pattens. There are finds of pattens from the 12th and 13th century, making them an useful accessory for the medieval person. Finds of 14th century pattens in London are often decorated for the higher classes, and gets more common later in the century. In the 15th century they become increasingly popular, with many different models and variations. Lots of extant finds show this trend, as well as the pattens being frequently showed in contemporary art. Based on this knowledge, I decided to focus mainly on the late 14th and 15th century variations of pattens.

Materials and models

Pattens can be found with soles in joined layers of leather, as well as wood, and with a solid sole or a two-pieced variant, joined with leather almost like a hinge. Examples with a wooden platform on top of stilts or wedges in wood or metal can also be found.

Examples of wood being used in finds; alder, willow, poplar and one example of beech. Aspen was prohibited for use in England in 1416 (which tells us it was probably a popular choise) but 1464 it was stated that it was allowed to make pattens of aspen wood not suitable for arrowshafts (Shoes and Pattens).

15th and early 16th century pattens, both wood and layers of leather was used for soles.

Straps made of leather

All extant examples I have studied have straps made of leather (vegetable tanned cowhide seems to be the choice), though there are lots of different strap fastenings. Some pattens have one strap over the front part of the foot, almost like flip flops, while others also have straps at the sides or behind the heel, joining in a strap around the ankle. The heel straps can be first seen in late 14th century finds.

Looking at contemporary artwork, many working persons from the period wear practical pattens with a sturdy strap over the foot, while higher classes have more formed soles with delicate straps, sometimes decorated, and sometimes with a buckle.

To adjust the fit of the straps there are examples of metal buckles, ties and leather strips secured with a piece of leather or a nail among other varieties. The leather used for straps are generally thinner than the one used to join a split sole, and to make it sturdier a seam, a binding or a folded edge have been used. Two layers of leather sewn together is another method. The leather could be decorated with dyes or edges of contrasting colours and stamps or cut outs in patterns.

To fasten the leather to the soles iron nails were used, both for the straps and the sole hinge. Sometimes a second leather strap was nailed down around the sole to finish of the look and protect the foot straps from wear. Other words used for the nails are dubs, pins and pegs but I choose to follow the item descriptions on the online database of the Museum of London naming them nails. It also seems that the medieval examples have the same shape and size as nails to other kinds of work.

pattens2

Metal buckles and other fastenings

There are several examples of metal buckles represented in artwork on pattens from the 15th century, and finds from the 14th and 15th century of similar buckles made in iron, brass, bronze and copper allow to mention some examples. Because most buckles are found loose it is hard to say which ones was used for belts, shoes, pattens and purses. I opted for some examples from contemporary artwork to show you, and if you want to further examine buckles from the period there are lots of finds on online museum collections as well as in Dress Accessories.

Examples of metal buckles in contemporary artwork

There are several finds from sites in Europe like London and Amsterdam as well as examples from Germany. If you want to see more extant finds, Museum of London online collection is a great source to begin with.

Hugo van der Goes, The Portinari Altarpiece/Triptych, c 1475

Sources:

Grew and Neergaard (2001) Shoes and pattens p. 91-101

Egan and Pritchard (2002) Dress Accessories 1150-1450

Goubitz (2011) Stepping Through Time: archaeological footwear from prehistoric times until 1800.

Museum of London online collection (20200416) https://collections.museumoflondon.org.uk/online/search/#!/results?terms=medieval%20patten

Extant find at the top; Museum of London online collection. 15th c patten in wood with leather and iron nails.

A patten maker; (20200416) https://hausbuecher.nuernberg.de/75-Amb-2-317-106-v

patinor2


Leave a comment

15th c clothing for men

Love got some new garments for his 15th c outfit this autumn. Do you remember the wedding outfit he had, with the silk doublet?

IMG_3004

It is a bit fancy for the everyday outdoor event, so now I made him a wool doublet with linen lining. It is based on period artwork, such as this painting by Rogier van der Weyden (St. John Altarpiece ca 1455-1460)

20181030_115932.jpg

The doublet has a couple of bronze buttons in the sleeves so he can open them if he needs to pull up the sleeves when doing dishes, and the front is closed with lacing in silk. It is not as tight fitting as the silk doublet, giving him more freedom of movement (or adding some weight in the gym)

He also got a wool coat with linen lining and fur trimming, based on several paintings by van der Weyden, like this one that is a portrait of Nicolas Rolin (Beaune Altarpiece ca 1450)

20181030_120424

The black, fur trimmed coat seems to be one of the most fashionable garments during this period, you can see it on several men in portraits and religious scenes.

The belt is similar to the one in the painting, made in bronze and black leather. It was mostly this detail that made me do the coat, and since the belt set was a wedding gift from our friend H-G it seemed like a good combination.

IMG_3583

In combination with his black pilgrim hat the outfit gets quite striking, but maybe a bit black. A red hat or chaperone perhaps would do the trick? Or red pants?


Leave a comment

Houppelande tutorial- part 2

Last tutorial was about how I made my first Houppelande (medieval over dress) that was an early houppelande, with a pattern layout that saved in on the fabric.

5931a86a0d18262c3a16897a364f6eaf

Now we move on to the opposite; a full circular houppelande dress that was the high fashion during the 15th century, and where worn by both men and women (with different lengths and fashion details of course) The construction method for this one is open for discussion; there might have been gores and more pieces according to different fabric widths during the medieval period. This layout is practical and simple if your fabric is 150 cm wide and you want the houppelande to be of as much fabric as possible, the small pieces allowing you to save in on the fabric a little.

The construction idea is from an article I found ages ago (that is now lost on the internet?) And later tailor’s books which shows very full dresses for women and coats for men. The shape, style and drape of this method also looks similar to paintings of houppelandes.

First of, you need a lot of fabric. How much depends on your length, in this example I make a pattern that gives you a dress around 150 cm long; good for the shorter woman or for a man (since houppes for men usually leaves at least the shoes visible) That means you will need 5,2 meters of fabric for the dress itself, and then another 1,5 to 3 meters for the sleeves. Oh, and maybe a full lining to?

20170912_134638

The pattern is basically 4 quarters of a circle; forming a full circle when put together. The small pieces saves you some fabric, but you may cut out the full quarter circles if you prefer. If you go with the pieces, then sew them together with the quarters the first thing when you have cut them out, so you have 4 whole quarters.

Then, sew the shoulder seams together, that is the short straight seams above the arrows. Leave the arm holes (on the pattern they are cut out as half moons) and sew the sides together. To know how wide your arm holes should be; measure yourself loosely around your armpit, or use a previous pattern. Add extra cm for movement; at least 5-6 cm.

The seam length of the shoulder should follow your shoulder; between 10-14 cm depending on how long shoulders you have. The arm holes should be laying on the body, not falling down from the shoulder to your upper arm. Cut away what you don’t need, a little at a time if you are unsure.

When you are satisfied with the shoulder, arm holes and side seams, sew the back and front together with each other, front to front, back to back. In the front you leave an opening big enough so you can dress and undress easily. On paintings some dresses are open almost to the hip. In the back you need to leave an opening big enough for your neck, try it on and you will understand! The open seam will give you the neckline on the back, and can then be cut for a rounder style if you like, or you could add a collar.

So, that was it- quick and easy yes? Now the dress should look something like the sketch above, and you can attach the sleeves to the dress. Sleeves? Well, that is for the next part of the Houppelande tutorial series. Stay tuned!

Spara


Leave a comment

Lästips; handbok i 1400talsdräkt för män

Because the book is in Swedish; so will this blogpost be. It is about a new book about the late 15th century clothing for men.

Jag fick hem en helt ny bok, skriven på svenska, som handlar om den sena 1400talsdräkten för män. Det är så fantastiskt roligt att en sådan här bok görs, på svenska, av skickliga medeltidsmänniskor, med syfte att underlätta för andra att förstå och skapa 1400tal. Förutom att det är en lätt väg till kunskap så är det också ett tecken i tiden på att medeltida återskapande av olika slag blir större och större i Sverige!

Boken har en lättöverskådlig layout, enkel och tydlig text, och stycken som efter en snabb genomgång ger dig koll på dräkten. Det är den typen av bok jag skulle börja med att skaffa om jag ville göra 1400tal, eller ge till en nybörjare som vet *ingenting* men gärna vill vara med. Jag gillar att den tar upp en historisk överblick och talar om formspråk, för att därefter ge förslag på plagg som tillhör perioden. Det finns inga mönster eller steg för steg instruktioner för plaggen, sådana finns istället att köpa via reconstructing history eller görs själv med hjälp av en mönsterkonstruktionskurs eller Tailors assistant. Är du en sådan som vill forska vidare själv, så gräver du i referenslistorna som innehåller både bilder och litteratur. Det är helt enkelt en handbok riktad till återskapare som vill börja med perioden- så himla smart och häftigt!

Anna, som är en av två författare, har jag träffat flera gånger på event och hon är en skicklig hantverkare och återskapare, som också bloggar om mycket 1400tal (Willhelm känner jag inte än, men ring mig så tar vi en fika och nördar 1400tal!) Boken innehåller, förutom referenslistor, också massor av bilder från perioden. Bredvid varje avsnitt om plagg/material osv hittar du alltså både historiska referenser, bilder, skisser och materialförslag från ett modernt perspektiv. Mycket bekvämt med andra ord, eftersom mycket arbete som du behöver för att kunna återskapa dräkt redan är gjort i boken.

Rikard och Helena från Handelsgillet är också delägare i Chronocopia som ger ut boken, och arbetar (förutom att sälja material och produkter) med att sprida kunskap om återskapande. I boken finns det en del produkter från deras shop, vilket kanske kan ses som reklam- eller ett praktiskt sätt att få tag på bra material att fota för att belysa tygfärger, material och vad man kan hitta för att praktiskt återskapa perioden. Jag tycker att det är ett bra initiativ, jag vet att de gör mycket efterforskningar kring färger och val av material de köper in för att allt ska vara historiskt, och här är deras shop Handelsgillet för dig som vill hitta material från boken (den tunna kyperten som syns har jag använt till flera av mina dräkter).

Nästa bok behandlar kvinnodräkten- gissa vem som ska klicka hem den också…

 

 


Leave a comment

Historical reading tip- part 7

This is what I read right now; The first book of fashion. It is really two surviving dress diaries from the 16th century German, that has been put together and analyzed with comments and introduction to both the art and the time and period. It is a really well put together book, full of interesting reading.

If you are interested in recreating male clothing from this period, it is like a dictionary or bible full of clothing examples, with comments about what materials different garments were made of. It also have a recreated outfit at the end, with lots of information.

This is part 7 in my “reading tip/book tip series”, the earlier posts are in Swedish and you can find them here. Or just type in “dagens boktips” in my search field on the blog. Today’s post was rather short, because the sun is shining outside for the first time in forever, I’m heading out with the horse on an autumn forest ride, and then I’m of to visit some friends for the weekend. Hope you will have a wonderful weekend!


3 Comments

Medieval wedding dress

I’m in the process of making my wedding dresses, which will be from the late 15th century.

Of course I want a nice looking wedding dress, but at the same time I want to be able to wear the dress on more occasions than the wedding. So I wont be having a pure white dress, since that is really unpractical. Instead, I have bought some lovely green (yes, I know I already have that green shade on several garments…) wool, a darker green velvet and a creme coloured silk fabric. This combination will be the wedding dresses, but it’s hard to decide exactly want I want to do.

But I have started with the basic dress in the creamy silk (or is it more like ivory perhaps?) cutting out the skirt and drafting the pattern. Now I have a bunch of orders to tend to, but after that I’m planning to sew wedding clothes only for a couple of weeks!

I also plan to make H a new outfit fot the wedding. We will match, of course, so I’m looking at the late 15th century and planning a doublet in silk (see below), hose in black wool, and an outer garment made of the same green wool that I bought for myself. The shirt will be in white linen or silk.

Anyway; I’ve made a pinterest folder with some inspiration and the different fabrics I’ve bought; https://www.pinterest.se/handcraftedhist/medieval-wedding-ideas/

If you have any input on design or practicality- feel free to send me a note here or on facebook!

Spara


2 Comments

The Spring Crown Tournament

Last weekend me and sweetheart went to a really good SCA event with over 200 people, lots of fun happenings, new friends and a good party. Our group Gyllengran arranged everything, though we only helped out on some small tasks. And, of course there was a tournament, won by Duke Siridean MacLachlan and Lady Jahanara. (Drachenwald crown tournament can be equaled with EM for you non-Sca people who wants to now). I had my shop with me so most of the time was spent selling stuff and talking to new and old friends, but I managed to take some photos from the event.

Handcrafted Historys shop with lots of handcrafting material, accessories for both medieval and viking outfits, some tutorials, jewelry and second hand stuff. My friend B sold stuff to the right, and Kerstin from Medeltidsmode sold her nice fabrics on the far end. Of course I didn’t need anything so I didn’t buy any fabric. I just bought a small piece for a very important but for now secret project…

To keep warm I wore my new houppelande dress, hand sewn in green wool, lined with silk inside the sleeves and trimmed with silk at the bottom. The front is trimmed with rabbit fur that I bought from a woman who breed rabbits for food and fur in her home (she takes good care of the animals, and the tanning is made eco-friendly. For me it’s really important were I get the fur from, since I’m an animal lover and strongly against any cruelty).

On my head, a 15th century hairdo and also my 16th c yellow gollar, lined with some more fur from the same as above, to keep me warm.

Banquet hall is getting prepared and decorated.

Some fighting outdoors with a really big audience.

J & Bs son had a really cute hat to keep warm, and of course a handsewed viking outfit to match his parents.

K looking awesome in her new trossfrau outfit!

My love in the middle, looking as if he had some mischief planned.

I forgot to ask for their names, but I met this really nice couple and look at her amazing headwear! Wow!

This will now turn into an inspirational blog post since people during the afternoon started to change into their party outfits. There were so much nice clothes and handcraft everywere, so I just had to leave my shop with K some time to be able to take photos (no, I didn’t have a chance to take everyones picture but I wish I did). If you know the SCA names of the persons, or the ones that are behind this really awesome outfits- please leave a comment on the post!

The event took place in a really big school, and just as we used to sit around the floors during the breaks when we were in school, some took up small picnics with handcraft during the event.

Ds party outfit, an Italian 15th century I believe.

Well done and awesome 14th century outfit.

There will be a part 2 with more photos, as soon as I have had time to sort them out. Hang in!

(And as usual, if you don’t want to appear here, just send me a notice and I will remove you from the blog. You are also welcome to use the photos you appear on, for private use only, as long as you link to the blog and write out me, Linda, as the photographer.)

 

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara


Leave a comment

Dagens lästips

Idag blir det ett kort inlägg, jag är på resande fot för lite materialinköp till framtida kurser, umgänge med nya och gamla vänner och sömnad hela helgen lång!

Är du intresserad av vikingatid? Då har Burr på Historiska fynd gjort en samling mycket läsvärda artiklar som handlar om smycken och dräkt av olika slag. Perfekt för dig som funderar på vad du vill skaffa till din vikingadräkt eller vill veta mer. Bra läsning med massor av källor!

img_0853

Spara

Spara


Leave a comment

A new outfit for A

My friend A visited some time ago and since he is the one making all my folders and paper handouts it was time that I made him a new medieval outfit. A really likes the 13th and early 14th century, so we decided to make a “bladkjortel”- a rather long kirtle with an opening at the front. The kirtle is made of two different colours since A bought the fabric on a second hand store for a bargain, and I added some buttons by the wrist to make it more fashionable for the period. The slits at the front is really common in different paintings, and good to have on a warm day. There are also two slits at the front of the sleeve seams, which is another thing very common in paintings from the period.

img_1445-2

I got some fabric left, so I also made him a pilgrim bag and a hood. Under is a simple linen shirt. I think the whole outfit took about 2 days to make, with lots of coffee breaks. It will be nice to see the whole outfit with the pieces A already had, maybe I could get him to take a photoshot when he’s home…

img_1453-2

img_1460-2

 


1 Comment

Glötagillet 2016

My SCA group (Gyllengran) arranged a handcraft-themed event a while ago, so I thought I should show you some photos, and a couple of nice outfits that I photographed during the event. It was a chilly autumn day with a cold wind, so here comes some nice inspiration for alla of you who want to be outside without freezing. My outfit? Never mind, I actually kind of forgot it was cold outside and brought to little clothes. Lucky for me it was warm inside.

I wore my old blue winter dress, good for cold events. Here together with silk accessories like me new silk sleeves, purse, tablet woven belt and hairband, everything 14th century. But I would have needed another woolen dress, mittens and a hood to stay warm outside.

img_1372

The hairdo seemed to be rather simple, but turned out a bit tricky to achieve on my own, the braids wanted to fall down so I had to use some bobby pins. But after a few tests it worked out nicely, not one of my favorites but ok and historical accurate enough. I think I need more training in hairdos….

img_1368-2

I braided two simple braids and ended them with thin rubber bands, then I attached the braids to each other on top of my head with some bobby pins so they would lie secure while I twisted the band/ribbon around them. With the hairband I then pulled them tightly around my head, wrapped the band at the base of my neck, and knotted it at the start of the braids.

img_1375-2-kopia

At the event, the theme for this year was “hard handicraft” which basically means any handicraft that is worked out with tree, metal, glas and the like… So we had workshops in beadmaking, bronze casting, different jewelry classes and beermaking. Beer? If you know my group, then you would know that beer is a totally appropriate thing to do during such a theme. Actually, during any event, handicraft or not… While drinking coffe, of course.

img_1310   img_1304

Historical beer making

 img_1275Making models for the bronze casting

img_1307

img_1389

img_1391

Historical glass beads in the making, with modern equipment.

img_1351

Lali’s amazing outfit from different views. English 16th century.

img_1354

img_1357

img_1398

Y visited with a new family member

img_1387

Great 16th century coat/jacket to keep warm! Have to make me one of those…

img_1347

S/A kept warm with a loose fitting, woolen overdress and linen veil and wimple. Great way to protect yourself from cold winds.

img_1283

Sessan in her 16th century English gown, worn over an apron, a kirtle and a shirt/shift.

img_1297

Also, lace edged underpants, socks and shoes. Good way to keep warm, and underpants- they are kind of sexy right?

Need to make me a pair of those to. And maybe a new outfit to go with them…

img_1316

Eleanor with her warm 14th century outfit. A dress with holes in the side for wearing your purse safely inside the dress, and warming your hands to.

Hood, veil and bycocket and a brocade purse with tassels.

img_1312

I made this two stand still to take some pictures of them. E (left) is wearing his viking era outfit.

A (right) has a 14th century coat made from the Herjolfnes find with hood, mittens and a coif under a felted hat.

The SCA as a community has a period span from 600 AD to 1600 AD so during our events there’s really a mix of different time periods and outfits. Great to finding new inspiration, but sometimes hard on your saving-for-new-fabric-money…

It was a great event, and after all the workshops during the day the event continued inside with food, drinks and party during the evening.

 

img_1374-2

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara