HANDCRAFTED HISTORY


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Summer adventures

Hi there!

If you know me, you know I am travelling and living my medieval/viking adventure life right now, and both blog and social media conversations are running low. If you are new- welcome here! I will not leave you bored in the middle of the event season, but have prepared some interesting posts for you to check out.

Last year at Visby; only a week left now!

The best way to reach me right now is by email. I also try to keep Instagram updated, but rarely use Facebook since it doesn’t work great on the phone. https://linktr.ee/handcraftedhistory for more ways to reach me!

If you are attending Medeltidsveckan in Visby, you can find me at Kapitelhusgården from Sunday to Sunday. The shop is open, and I also have workshops in pattern drafting and tablet weaving. These are currently fully booked, but you can check out the full schedule here: https://medeltidsveckan.se/programme/

Last years pattern drafting (sleeves)


Are you attending one of my workshops and have questions? Send me an email! The info at the program states if you need anything special (like a modern t-shirt or similar clothes on your body for the pattern making) othervise you can just stroll in with a snack and a ticket- I will bring everything else!

If you want to check out more about Medeltidsveckan I have written about past adventures here; https://handcraftedhistory.blog/?s=visby where you also find the old guide and the packing list in Swedish.

If you are planning your packing, this blog post is new and improved:
https://handcraftedhistory.blog/2022/05/15/the-ultimate-packing-list/

In my shop you will find lots of straw hats and felted wool hats- but be sure to come by early in the week to secure the colour/size you want. Last year they sold out. For you readers interested in straw and wool hats but not attending Medeltidsveckan- I will open up my Etsy store and start accepting commissions when I am back home and can start packing and shipping regularly again. Thank you for your patience! (Yes- I remember you who have emailed/pm/contacted me)

At Kapitelhusgården

New blog posts, patterns and research articles will be coming again this autumn- I look forward to share new and interesting stuff with you! With that said, I will continue with my packing/working/panic sewing days. Yes, I also have late projects. Yes, I will also sew on the ferry over… It is tradition, is it not?


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Want to live in a Historical Tent?

I could call myself somewhat of a pro at living in historical tents, or more accurately, sleeping bad and freezing in historical tents… Therefore, I present to you a guide on how to choose your tent and live comfortable in that!

(This turned out to be a really long blog post- I have apparently missed talking to you. I marked all my personal thoughts and anecdotes with cursive, for easier reading)

Which period?

Different models are based on finds from different periods, so if you are going on viking adventures the Geteld or A-frame models are most often used. For medieval adventures, Getelds and Pavilions are good choices. Small shelters called “Soldier’s tents” are also often used.

When looking at websites selling tents, many will show you models that are not based on finds or pictures but called “historical” anyway. The openings could be placed in new ways, the seams made to save fabric widths or moved to be able to sew on a machine. The poles and ropes holding the tent up might be done in different ways that can not be seen in manuscripts and so on… These tents may still be good tents, but it is always good to know what you buy, and what it is based on for the future. If you are unsure about a model, ask!

A-frame tents at a viking market

What says finds and historical pictures?

Viking type tents are based on ship burials which have included a tent with a wooden frame and canvas. We don’t really know if people actually slept in these on land as well, and they probably did not bring them to different markets all summer… But what to do, when you are a modern person wanting some comfortable living?

Medieval type tents are seen in numerous manuscripts and paintings, both used by nobility and commoners. Brightly painted, large tents are used for festivities, tournaments and for avoiding that pesky sun, while small sleeping tents and shelters can be seen in military settings. A quick search gave me this board.

Round pavilions at Double Wars.

Where are you going?

Many events have lists or recommendations about what tent models are allowed on their events. Mostly, you can bring Getelds and A-frames to viking events, as well as small canvas pieces as simple roofs. To medieval events, Getelds are often allowed, as well as square, round and oval-shaped Pavilions. Materials may also be advised to be linen or wool.

Sleeping tent in the middle, and large pavilions in the background.

The event organizer will want to have as pretty a camp as possible, but at the same time, they know tents are really expensive and that guests will stay at home if their living investment is not allowed. The same is true with market tents; most of them are not strictly historical since a modern seller will need light loads to carry and transport, as well as a big enough tent to be able to bring enough products to earn a living. Not everyone can sell jewellery and candy, so some will need big, bright and roomy tents.

Other things to consider are the campgrounds; is it rocky and hard to put down tent pegs? Then an A-frame tent might be good. Is it often stormy and windy, then perhaps a smaller tent with a sturdy frame and long tent pegs is a good choice. Have you ever seen a jumping A-frame tent in a storm? I have, they can really get quite far…

Cotton, linen or wool?

Cotton is by far the most common tent canvas today since it is cheaper, lighter and easy to come by in the right thickness and waterproofing. I use cotton in my Pavilion to be able to lift the canvas pieces myself and to have a tent that is bright enough for customers to see my products, even if it is rainy outside. But oooh, my old linen pavilion was prettier!

Linen is heavier but more resistant to mold, and unbleached linen will keep your tent cooler and darker. Perfect for sleeping in, not so good if you are a market vendor selling fabrics. Linen gets bleached over time in the sun, giving the canvas a really good look.

Wool is mostly used in A-frames and a good, felted wool fabric will keep you dry, cool and comfortable in all kinds of weather. May be waterproofed with modern products, or with lanolin (wool fat) which is more historical.

Different types of fabrics; brown wool tent, white cotton tents and the unbleached linen pavilion in the background.

Consider this when choosing your model:

  • Packing space available (how much space do you have in your car for a tent canvas and wooden frame?)
  • Storing space (where will you keep the tent off season?)
  • How many people and how much stuff do you need to fit?
  • Is it important that you can put up the tent fast?
  • Is it important that the tent is easy to lift/carry? (consider a canvas in several pieces)
  • Should the door be big (welcoming/good shop) or small at one edge (more sleeping space)?

I have always been partial towards Geteld models since they are often economical, easy to transport and fast to put up and down.

With that said, after living for weeks in this model you will get really tired of the sloping walls, giving you almost no space to hang clothes for drying (except in the middle). Storing all your things around the base of the tent will save lots of space to allow you to walk around in the middle, but it will also mean you crawling around on your knees looking for things every day.

A-frame tents also seem very practical and I am slightly jealous of my friends when we are putting up camp at rocky, hard grounds. While I am sweating and swearing trying to put down the tent pegs in the ground, they simply fold their tent in place, secure the canvas by the frame and move in. I usually get my revenge when the carrying distance between car and camp is long since I can carry my poles in one go…

A-frame tents are practical, economical and if you have the storage and packing space for the frame it is a good choice. It is also considered the easiest tent to make yourself.

Pavilions often have a roof with separate walls, allowing you to open up different sections of the tent if you want the breeze to get in, or want a nice display area. Straighter walls with poles or wooden wheels mean you can place furniture along the walls, and hang clothing from the wooden frame, which is both practical and pretty. More sloping walls on the other hand might ride out storms better.

Round and square pavilions may be sensitive to hard winds and storms; during the Medieval Week in Visby you may see knocked down tents of these models, or tents laid down by choice before a storm. If the round pavilion has a sturdy roof frame, you can remove the middle pole, fold the walls and secure the roof down to the ground covering all your furniture and belongings while you wait for the storm to pass. You might not fit inside, but your tent will survive…

If you only want a sleeping place, tents called “soldier’s tent” or one-man tents might be the right choice for you. I would advise you to get a tent big enough to fit a bed inside, then you will always have a dry space, and can store your things under the bed.

Will I get wet?

A good tent will keep you dry even in heavy rains, as long as you can stay of the ground (in a folded camp bed or wooden bed for example). Also, never put clothes or bedding up close to the canvas, ideally, nothing should touch the canvas walls except the framework.

Our oval pavilions have kept out heavy rains on several occasions, with the single drop or two from a slacking corner joint between roof and wall. During one event, the rain was so heavy that small runlets formed and travelled through the tent. Everything above ground kept dry, but a turn shoe almost floated away…

Look for a tent construction that has sloping roof/walls, and a canvas that is thick, sturdy and treated with a waterproofing agent. Even so, after some years out and about the canvas may need to get additional waterproofing.

How to care for a historical tent:

Let’s start at the beginning; oil all your wooden poles upon arrival, and once a year after that (or when needed). When you put up your tent; find the right way to do so without adding unnecessary tension to the pole, canvas or ropes. The same goes for taking down the tent; do so slowly and controlled, and get some friends to help you in the beginning. Always mend loose ropes, or broken seams at once. Make sure the tent canvas is really dry before folding it away in the storage, and that it is reasonably clean since rotting mud, grass and insects may cause damage to the canvas over time. Brushing away loose bits before folding the tent is good. I also brush off the dirt from the tent pegs and ropes. The canvas should be stored in a dry space, outdoor sheds are not ideally. I can give you several examples of people having their tents destroyed by mold and rats during winter…

More tips to be comfortable in the tent:

  • Furniture like a bed, table and chairs (so you don’t have to sleep and sit on damp ground)
  • A heater for those chilly events (if you live in an area with cold nights and rains). We have a portable gasoline radiator (the same type you might have in a trailer van).
  • A mosquito net to drape over the bed at night
  • Look for opportunities to hang things inside the tent; a lantern and a rope for drying clothes make life easier.

Things to ask (or look for) when buying a tent:

  • What material is the canvas made of, and is it waterproof? Treated to withstand mold? Treated to slow fire down?
  • How much does the canvas weight? Does it come in 1 or several pieces?
  • How long are the frame/tent poles?
  • Are rope and tent pegs be included?
  • How should you take care of the tent?
  • If the tent canvas breaks, is it possible to buy additional fabric for mending?

Pricing?

Historical tents are expensive. Or at least, there is lots of money involved. The cheapest way is often to make one yourself if you have the time, space and skill. The second-hand market is also a really good choice, when people get tired of their small, practical tents and want to level up, they will often sell them for a good price. But try to inspect the tent yourself before you pay for it (ideally put up) to avoid bad canvas, mold, rips or a cracked frame.

A short sneek view over the camping ground at Double Wars; here you can see many different kinds of tents!


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Medeltidsveckan 2021

This post is in Swedish since it is info about my workshops during the Medieval Week in Visby

ärmkursen för några år sedan

Äntligen är årets kurser ute i programmet!

  • Tisdag förmiddag toile/överkropp
  • Onsdag eftermiddag brickbandsvävning
  • Torsdag förmiddag ärmkurs
  • Fredag förmiddag hosor


Förutom klassikerna där du lär dig göra medeltida mönster till din överkropp, och kursen där du lär dig allt om ärmkonstruktion, har jag tagit fram en kurs med sammansydda hosor, efter flera önskemål! Mönsterkonstruktionskurserna är intensivkurser där du får designa/rita/prova in ett mönster till dig själv, som du sedan tar med dig hem och använder i framtida medeltida sömnad.

Hosor? Den här kursen går igenom hur du tar mått och sedan ritar ett hosmönster + provar in det på dig själv. Vi går igenom separata hosben, fot, sammansydda hosor (byxor) och blygdkapsel (tänk 1300-1500tal). Prat om historiska, nördiga moden, stoppade vader och annat roligt kan förekomma…

Det brukar vara roligt, mycket tankeverksamhet och nya kunskaper! Kurserna passar dig som provat sy något plaggliknande innan, typ en tunika eller moderna plagg, samt dig som redan kan sy men vill vässa mönstertekniken. Alla kurserna passar för alla kön/identiteter och vi ser till att alla känner sig bekväma vid nålning på varandra. Tips: ta på dig tajta, moderna kläder såsom tshirt/linne/shorts/tights för att det är enklare att prova in mönster då.

Jag har också populära Brickbandsvävningskursen på onsdag eftermiddag, perfekt för dig som vill lära dig brickbandsvävning men typ bara hållit i garn förut (eller för dig som provat men nu vill ha alla grunderna)!

Du behöver inte skaffa något; allt material, verktyg och häften ingår. Kaffe/te/vatten finns på Kapitelhusgården. Ta gärna med fika/frukt om du vill snacksa under kursen (men inga nötter pga allergier).

Om Covid: Vi håller till i den stora stensalen på Kapitelhusgården. Under kurserna är det bara kursdeltagare i rummet och det finns möjlighet att arbeta med avstånd mellan varandra, tex vid olika bord. Vid inprovning på varandra får ni egna nålar/verktyg att hantera, det finns handsprit och du får gärna ta med eget munskydd om du vill använda. Jag är fullvaccinerad. Blir du sjuk eller får symptom kommer du givetvis inte, utan ger bort din plats till en vän (säg till på plats).

Jag kommer finnas på Kapitelhusgården stora delar av veckan, och har min shop med mig ifall du vill fylla på med extra material, sömnadsredskap, vävgarner/tråd eller bara nöjes-shoppa fint bling. Jag kommer också sälja lite extra nördiga saker från andra hantverkare såsom knivreplikor, hårnät och smycken.

Men jag tror att jag startar veckan med att ta med mig gamla kläder, skor, testplagg och en hel del utförsäljning som jag hoppas ska få nya ägare som vill bära dem under veckan… Vi ses!


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Early 14th century outfit

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This is my early 14th century outfit, hand-stitched and made with inspiration from medieval manuscript sources, like the Luttrell Psalter from early 14th c England.

I made the dress for my video project and wanted to put together a whole outfit that would fit in the same time period. It turned out super comfy, maybe I could wear it instead of my comfy pants indoors..?

I also made it so it would be usable in the viking outfit if I would be in need of a thin woollen dress/kirtle under the apron dress. Hence the looser sleeves, shorter length and not so wide neckline. It is certainly not the most fashionable 14th c outfit, rather an outfit for work, like in my market stall. (Uhum, much suitable, very nice thinking there…)

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This dress will be featured in my online lecture about Medieval Dress (only in Swedish right now!) and as I know that many of you readers are Swedes or understand Swedish, I will post a link to the lecture here. For you non-Swedish speakers; I have not forgotten you, and will strive to translate interesting parts of the video to English and post it on a Youtube channel in the future.

dress

Until then, here’s a list of the materials used in the outfit if you get interested in making your own.

What items do you need?

For my outfit in size small-medium, based on fabrics 150 cm width

  • Linen shift, 2 meters. Linen thread and beeswax for sewing.
  • Wool kirtle as the visible layer. 2,6-3 meters of wool fabric. Wool, linen or silk thread for sewing.
  • Birgitta cap + linen half circle veil. 60 cm thin linen. Thin linen thread and beeswax.
  • Linen apron. 100*80 cm of sturdy linen, linen thread and beeswax.
  • Wool hose/socks. Around 70*100 cm wool twill.
  • Leather turn shoes.
  • Garters in wool or silk for the hose. Fabric scraps, woven ribbons or braids can be used.
  • Purse, here in brick stitched silk with silk tassels and a silk tablet woven band. Made by my friend Jenny!
  • Thin belt in leather or fabric.
  • Decorative brooch in brass with stones.
  • 3 dress pins in bronze.

14thcoutfit


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Medeltidsveckan i Visby 2019

(This will be in Swedish, since I am mostly talking about workshops held in swedish during the Medieval Week)

Vill tipsa om årets kurser under Medeltidsveckan, eftersom jag är superpeppad på Visby och längtar efter en till vecka med massor av härliga människor, medeltid och nya upplevelser!

Jag har mina favoritkurser på Kapitelhusgården som vanligt (boka i förtid- de brukar vara fulla!) med mönsterkonstruktion av tajt sittande plagg (tisdag morgon), ärmar (onsdag morgon) och grundkursen i brickbandsvävning (fredag morgon). Kurser jag älskar att hålla, och som är fulla med kunskap, inspiration och nya vänner!

Nytt för i år är att jag också hänger på marknaden med tältet och har ett litet försäljningsbord i Craft Hives hörna av marknaden. Förutom bra hantverksmaterial och lite smycken kan ni titta in med hantverksfrågor om ni behöver tips i sömnaden, och på måndag + torsdag eftermiddag har jag en inspirationskurs i brickbandsvävning- perfekt för dig som provat eller gått grundkursen men vill komma vidare med vävningen och få ny inspiration.

(Just nu förbereder jag kursen genom att provväva lite band med individuellt vridna brickor, bläddra i ny fantastisk litteratur och packa silkestråd. Jag tänker mig en kurs med kantvävning, svårare mönster, olika tekniker och givetvis ett eget projekt efter deltagarnas intresse)

Visste ni förresten att den hemliga butiken har en egen webbsida nu med kalendarium? Sök på nätet så hittar ni den, och ps- den är jobbvänlig.

Ska du till Medeltidsveckan i Visby? Jag blir superglad av att få träffa bloggläsare, så kom gärna förbi mig och säg hej!


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Summer plans for 2019

It feels like the Summer Season has started now, and I am sewing, planning market tours and writing on new workshops and lectures. Weekends are mostly planned with market visits. Have my hands full, more or less.

As many of you know, Handcrafted History is much more than this blog: it is my business and main living! For me, the summer season is both fun adventures and lots of work. I travel through Sweden and into Finland and Norway too, and I will try to keep you updated with all the fun stuff happening! I might not have lots of time to write blog posts though; so visit my Facebook page HandcraftedHistory and my Instagram with the same name for more updates.

Here is my current schedule with all markets and events I’ve got planned. If you visit one of them- please come by and say Hi! I love meeting blog readers =)

May 11; SCA event V.Ä.V

May 24-26 Oslo Middelalderfestival

May 27-June 2 SCA event Doublewars

June 14-16 Hamar Middelalderfestival

June 28-30 Alnö Medeltidsdagar

July 11-13 Skellefteå Medeltidsdagar

July 15-21 SCA event Cudgelwars

August 2-11 Medeltidsveckan

September 6-8 Gunnes Gård

On SCA events, Skellefteå Medeltidsdagar and Medeltidsveckan I also have workshops planned, if you want to learn viking/medieval pattern construction or tablet weaving. At Gunnes Gård there will be a viking themed workshop, but what is not yet decided. You can also come by during events to have your own personal pattern made by me; but you need to book a time in advance!

 


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Memories from Visby

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Greetings from Visby Medieval Week! Me and love traveled here with our friend Lali, shared an apartment and had a wonderful week with friends, ice-cream, new experiences, shows and music!

I spent most of my time at Kaptielhusgården, holding workshops in tablet weaving and pattern construction. Look at this amazing place! I never get tired being here and enjoy the feeling. During the mornings everything is more calm, but still buzzing with interesting classes and mealpreps in the kitchen.

I didn’t take any photos from my workshops this year, I always get so absorbed with talking and is more likely to forget the time… Also, this year was unbelievable hot and I actually got a heat stroke during one of my workshops. Phew!

The evening was better, and the last day cooler weather came over the sea, rolling in with thunder and rain. We celebrated by going to Kapitelhusgården for a drink (yes, back to work on my one free day)

We went to the marketplace, climbed the city to get the View, walked by the church St. Maria (and took the Stairs twice a day) visited Arkadias great show, and had a Good Time!

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And went for strolls in the botanical gardens, one of our favourite spots! A nice lady took this photo of us, love is wearing his wedding outfit, inspired from 15th c Italy, and I have a German 15th c outfit that is still on the try-sew-retry stage. Not completely happy with the folds and the neckline, but I have a new plan for it…

Last, I wanted to say Thank you! to everyone who stopped to say hi, or had a chat with me- it is so nice to meet readers old and new and make new friends!


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Going to Visby

Om ett par dagar bär det av till Visby, och jag kommer som vanligt hålla kurser på Kapitelhusgården! Kom gärna förbi och kursa med mig, eller säg hej om du ser mig på stan- jag tycker att det är så himla roligt att få träffa bloggläsare!

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Här är mina kurser (köp biljetter direkt i programmet eller droppa in en halvtimme innan i mån av plats)

Tisdag: 12.30 “Toile”

Grunder i mönsterkonstruktion för medeltida kläder där du gör en toile för överkroppen. Kom iklädd tajtare t-shirt/linne. Material och verktyg ingår.

Onsdag 08.30 “Toile”

Grunder i mönsterkonstruktion för medeltida kläder där du gör en toile för överkroppen. Kom iklädd tajtare t-shirt/linne. Material och verktyg ingår.

Torsdag 08.30 “Ärmar”

För dig som gått toilekurser/har en toile för överkroppen sedan tidigare och vill göra ärmar. Gör en ärmtoile till dig själv, få en massa sömnadstips och teori. Genomgång av svängd ärm, ärmkulle, Särm, Moybog mm. Material och verktyg ingår.

Torsdag 12.30 ”Brickbandsvävning med mönster”

Grundkurs för dig som vill väva men inte vet hur. Tydlig genomgång och handledning för att påbörja vävning och förstå vävda mönster. Material, verktyg/brickor och häfte ingår.

Fredag 08.30 ”Brickbandsvävning under medeltiden”

Grundkurs för dig som vill väva medeltida vardagsföremål. Snabb och effektiv vävning av strumpeband, bälten mm som blir enfärgade eller enkelt mönstrade. Historisk genomgång av fynd och tekniker. Material, verktyg/brickor och häfte ingår.

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Jag vill också passa på att göra reklam för den hemliga shoppen; den håller öppet nere på marknaden (sammma tält som förra året, men med en ny placering. Håll utkik efter skylten!) under onsdag kväll.

Yeay! In a couple of days me, love and our friend Lali (the Swedish guest blogger with all the great 16th c outfits) will be traveling to Visby Medieval Week, and we will be there all week!

I am working at Kapitelhusgården with workshops, and the rest of the time we are planning to hang out with friends, eat ice-cream, go to the medieval market, visit shows and hearing music concerts.

Here is some links if you are going to; for the schedule and the inofficial schedule for the week. And as always, if you see me during the week I would love to meet you and say Hi!

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Medeltidsveckan på Gotland!

Wow, time sure runs fast during summer. Now it is only 2,5 weeks before the medieval week in Visby, on the island Gotland here in Sweden and I have lots of work to do before we travel there. Me and love will be traveling with our friend L, and as usual, I will be at Kapitelhusgården holding workshops during the week. If you want to attend one of them you can prebook here.

There will also be a Secret Shop opening on a Secret Location in the market place during the week. If you know what I’m talking about- watch out for the sign!

Anyway, I haven’t had the time to write new posts for you, even if I have heaps of good photos and adventures to tell you about. They will have to wait until autumn, and instead I wanted to give you some reading tips (in Swedish and English) if you are preparing for Visby (or any other medieval/viking event) and want some inspiration.

Some photos from last week 2017

…and more photos from the year before

The list I wrote some years ago for packing for a medieval tent event

My guide (in English) to the Medieval week and in Swedish

Hope you will enjoy these links, and if you are going to visit Visby- I would be so happy if you came by and said hi to me =) Some of my most dear memories includes meeting readers and making new friends during the medieval week!

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Visby Medieval Week 2017

This Medieval week in Visby was rather different from my previous ones; I traveled without love (who was working) and lived indoors in a rented apartment with two friends. I also had workshops scheduled for every day I was there, and just had a free afternoon the day we arrived. So, with that said, I don’t have much photos since I was working a lot, but I wanted to share some moments with you- both by camera and words.

Me and my two friends really had the best living and it was easy to share with them, but we did have different hours so often I was on my own to and from work. It actually was really nice, I had some of my best moments because I was out on my own, strolling or talking with people and new friends I otherwise wouldn’t have time to see. I really recommend having some time on your own during the Medieval Week- it’s the perfect way of meeting new friends!

And adventuring on my own also means climbing things; even if wearing a full silk dress and veils…

One afternoon I met up with Minna to take some photos in the botanical garden, one of them is now the header for my social media! Here in the late afternoon light, trying to tie up my headwear without a mirror and enough pins (it ended up hanging from one side as you may have seen…)

Minna in her awesome hood; made from a manuscript from South Europe.

Work, I say? Yes, since I run Handcrafted History as my full-time commitment, most of my medieval and viking adventures and event is about work for me. I either have my market stall, selling clothes and handcrafting materials, or holding workshops and lectures. During Medieval Week, I mostly work at Kapitelhusgården, which is a lovely place and medieval restaurant in the middle of Visby. During the day, they offer workshops and lectures, and in the evening the garden transforms to a restaurant and pub, with a picnic-feeling. I love the place!

I am holding my workshops there during the week, and this year one of my attending handcrafters took some pictures with my camera- so I actually have some during-work-photos. (This usually never happen because I get so busy with the workshop and explaining things…) So this is what it could look like when I’m holding workshops! I usually wear medieval or viking clothing when I work, but on modern locations such as universities I wear my everyday clothing (if nothing else is requested).

Linnea whom I traveled and lived with

And J, from my local group, meeting in the park for a chat and some photos