HANDCRAFTED HISTORY


2 Comments

Research post: Medieval straw hats in art

Introduction: Straw hats of different shapes got my interest a while ago, and I made some research around them. They seem to appear in art from around the 13th century onwards while changing design over the centuries.

My thoughts are that they are mainly seen in rural landscapes and working conditions; farmers and labourers working outside. They also appear on travellers, commoners being outdoors, harvest time etc. Some examples exist of straw hats on higher social status persons (but the artwork might be allegorical or symbolic rather than contemporary portraits).

Based on what I´ve seen in the artwork, I believe the straw hat to have been in use in a similar fashion as today; as an outdoors option for sunny weather, mainly to act as a sun barrier. They are often depicted in manuscripts like The labours of the months (Medieval calendars) during field labour in June, July and August on both men and women. Decorations are scarce, with the occasional headband in black or some other neutral colour the only decor visible.

15th century harvesting woman

Fashionable shapes? In art, the straw hat appears in many different forms. Some shapes seem to have been used for longer amounts of time (like the round one with a brim or the slightly unshaped hill form) while the conical shape of the 13th and early 14th century (seen in the Maciejowski bible) seems to be out of fashion later.

Maciejowski bible 13th c

During the second half of the 15th century and onwards you can spot a greater diversity in hat shapes and design, possibly mimicking the fashion for headwear during this period. The late 15th century is, after all, a rather crazy fashion period with lots of options in sizes, shapes, design and silhouettes! During the 16th century, heads with a flat top and flatter shaped hats become more common in the artwork I have looked through.

1519-28 man harvesting wines

The artwork in this blog post is mainly collected from today’s Germany, England and Italy, but this excellent webpage has a collection of more hats in period artwork if you are interested.

http://www.larsdatter.com/strawhats.htm

Differently shaped straw hats made by Handcrafted History

Materials: Based only on the artwork, it is impossible to determine which kind of straws were used to make hats, and my guess is that it also depended upon local traditions and what material was readily available to the artisans. It is not impossible to weave or braid straw yourself even if it takes practice to make it look good, and since the material is available for free in most areas I think it likely that these hats were commonly made in the local community rather than imported. Most hats are also seen on workers in the field (though the occasional more fashionable straw hat appears in city settings), supporting the theory on local manufacturing.

Detail from the Merode Altarpiece, Robert Campin

To continue on the line of guessing, both straw from agriculture, grass straw and wetland reed may be used to weave straw hats. If you want to find yourself a nice historical hat, look for something grown where your persona/character would live, and avoid exotic plants like palm leaves.

Book of hours, Morgan Library

Diffferent kinds of straw available today:

Wheat straw is soft, shiny (and if you ask my horse, super cosy come winter) and very possible material for hats, at least in those parts of Europe cultivating wheat regularly. Oat straw I have no handcrafting experience with, but the horse likes it in his bed, and there’s always some oats left to munch on. Barley was a common grain in Sweden during the Middle ages, and is a rather stiff and durable straw, like rye.

Rye straw is a traditionally used material in Sweden for making straw crafts because of it’s length and durability, and rye is a hardy crop. For handcrafting material today, rye is being grown for its straw and harvested before giving grain, whereas the medieval straw was probably taken during the grain harvest.

Wheat straw hat made by Handcrafted History

One important difference between the straw today versus the medieval straw is the mechanical machines munching up straw during harvest, making it usable mainly for animal bedding or farming. Before machines took over, the harvest was done by hand and a scythe takes off the straw at the ground without crushing it. After the grain was collected, you would have great amounts of material. Very handy!

How were straw hats made? I believe contemporary artwork show different methods in use for making straw hats. There seems to be evidence for different kinds of weaving techniques and patterns (when you braid the straw together until you have formed a whole hat) as well as sewn hats with braided straw tape as a base (when you first make a tape and then sew it into a hat shape). The find looks to be made from woven or braided tapes, layered on top of each other.

Several straw hats on female field labourers

I have only found one extant find of a straw hat from today’s Germany, rather beaten up but at least you can see what it is. Do you know of any more finds? I would love to check them out!

Kempten, Germany 15-16th c

Conclusions if you want to sport a straw hat yourself:

Go for a hat made with natural straw, such as those mentioned above. Handwoven in one piece, or made out of braided tapes sewn together depending on what you can find (avoid the obviously machine-stitched ones). Pick a shape that fits in with the period you would like to reenact, and don’t decorate it overmuch. Use your hat outdoors as a nice shade from the sun, but replace it with a smarter looking hat or veil/hairdo during winter and indoor festivities.

Early 15th c Les Tres Riches Heures de Duc de Berry

Some practical tips from this very experienced hat-wearer:

Straw hats during summer will shade you from the sun and help you avoid sunburn and heatstroke. If it is really hot, use a cap, coif or linen wrap drenched in cold water under the hat. A ribbon may be pulled through your hat at the base to hold it in place on your head, or you could use pins to secure it to your linen layer underneath. If your hats get a bit crooked or bent, spray it with some warm water and set it to dry in the shape you want.

Harvesters, man wearing a straw hat, Tacuinum Sanitatis

Feel the need for a good straw hat? I am currently making and selling different models; check out my FBpage to look at the different hats and place an order! This last bit is totally advertising my own business. Yep. Send me your money.

Deutsche Bibel, 1463


Leave a comment

15th century inspo

Here’s an alternative look for you 15th century geeks out there! I took the photos in 2018, but apparently put them in that “good to have” pile on the computer, and they were forgotten. This happen quite often for me…

Linen shift closest to the body, wool socks and leather shoes. Over the shift I wear the easy 15th century dress, here used as a middle layer/kirtle. I like to be able to use my clothes in different layers, and this dress is a perfect summer over dress, but also works as the middle layer once it gets colder.

The over dress is a wool houppelande, lined with silk and with openings in the sleeves. This style is popular by the 50s and 60s, and can be seen in Rogier van der Weydens paintings. I keep the dress closed with a broad belt with bronze clasp; a copy from an original find. This is one of my favourite dresses, since it is comfortable to wear but looks fancy. It is quite heavy with the high quality woolen cloth draping around my body, but hey- you have to give a little effort to fashion sometimes?

The temple braids and turban-looking great veil is perhaps a bit “simple” for the dress, and I could also pair it with an elaborate headwear. But I really like this look since it is comfortable and, above all, I can manage it myself with 15 minutes by the mirror. If yo want to see how I do them; I have a braid tutorial here and a paper on the 15th century veils I use here.

If you want to research the 15th c yourself, feel free to use my pinterest as a starting point! This fashionable period has much interesting things to offer!


Leave a comment

2020 in review

There’s a lot to say about this year, but at least I’ve been having plenty of time for sewing. Unfortunately a bad shoulder gave me some pains, but with rest and a training program I think we are mostly friends again!

I thought it would be fun to share some projects with you here, as an inspiration and a kind of journal to myself: I always forget what I have been sewing, and find myself longing to finish yet another personal “small project” but not understanding why I don’t make any progress…

72 garments finished during 2020; both for customers, friends and myself. I am not going to write about them all, and many have not been photographed yet. I also have a whole bunch of things not yet ready; comissions, old projects known as UFOs (unfinished objects) and some rather new ideas I have been working on.

Easy, simple and comfortable blue viking dress. Want to make a similar? Use the Shift-making tutorial and the Insert a Gore-tutorial to make a long shift with 4 gores.

It was time to make some new viking clothes and I managed this blue dress, the red apron dress and some matching items, like the hand woven and woad plant dyed shawl. I am really pleased with how the outfit turned out, even if the outfit might not be sexy to the modern eye… I love experimenting with different historical cuts that could have been in use, trying out how they look and feel when I make and wear them.

Later I made this early 14th century outfit as I finally, after a long period of 15th century-romance, have laid my eyes on new conquests. The 13th and 14th centuries are very nice, and I want to get to know them a little more. Next project will be something from the Maciejowski/Morgan Bible.

I have made several complete outfits for customers based on viking age and medieval clothing, and this was the year when I only met GOOD CUSTOMERS! I kid you not! Everyone have been polite, fun to work with and sent their payments. For those of you working regularly in customer service; you know my feeling here! How did I get to be so lucky? And, will this continue during 2021?

A handsewn 16th century shirt inspired by the Sture shirt (without decorations and embroidery). This shirt took over 40 hours to make, more than most dresses… Is it pretty? Yes. Was it worth it? Give me another year before I answer…

I have also worked on 18th century clothing, learning more about the period and the methods in use. There’s a couple of skirts, a jacket in wool and one in printed cotton, as well as a small linen cap. I am looking forward to going to new kinds of events and trying out the kit to see if it will work.

I made a new short sleeved kirtle with a waist seam, similar to the blue Weyden-inspired dress from years ago. This dress is rather loose (I might need to take it in a bit in the side seams) and it’s made with a curved front seam. It is going to be a great working kirtle! The long sleeved green 15th c dress also got sold, they mysteriously shrinked in the wardrobe during last winter)

Apart from sewing I also dived into some video making, filmed lectures for the digital Medieval Week as well as setting up a new Youtube channel, and working with content for my Patreon page. Video editing and voice overs still makes me sweat, but my plan is to continue to inprove in these new areas, creating more and better content for you readers. Patreon makes this possible since I get support to work with my content, and my hope for 2021 is that my page will continue to grow, inspire and teach handcrafting ideas to everyone interested!

It feels like it is early yet to plan for this year, but of course I am hoping for a market season of some kind, and I have so much new content for sewing workshops and material for a new viking lecture as well. As for the blog, there is a long list with tutorials to make, as much as I have time for. All concluded, it really feels like 2021 will be a Great Year!


Leave a comment

Åka på lajv del 4: Att skapa en roll

Va, kommer inte rollskapandet förrän nu? Borde man inte börja här?

Jag trodde rollskapandet och ett detaljerat skrivande av rollen var viktigt, och ett sätt att vara en bra lajvare på, när jag började min lajvkarriär i tonåren. Det verkade ju viktigt på hemsidan? Efter att ha lajvat i 20+ år har jag dock insett att det finns andra saker som är viktigare, sett till hur roligt lajv jag kommer att få.

Det finns också väldigt många typer av spelare, och spelstilar när det kommer till att utveckla roller. H föredrar att klottra ner namn, yrke och ett par egenskaper att spela på, för att sedan ge sig ut och improvisera resten efter lajvet han är på. Andra älskar att hitta på namn, släktträd, ny mimik eller beteenden eller ge sig in i en roman om rollens tidigare liv.

Foto från Eterna, Sagors slut 2014. Två roller med både annan dräkt och mimik än spelarna.

Det spelar egentligen ingen roll. Vad är det då som gör en Roll till en Bra Roll på ett lajv?

Du är inte dig själv. Att lajva är spännande, händelserikt och rätt jobbigt. Du kommer uppleva allt det som din roll upplever, men filtret med att rollen och du är olika gör det trivsammare, och minskar risken för missförstånd. Det är ju trots allt inte Du som blir förråd, misstrodd, skrattad åt eller dödad- det är bara din roll. Du får nöjet att följa med på resan och uppleva saker som du inte skulle få i ditt vanliga liv.

Att lajva leder ofta till mycket känslor innan, under och efter lajvet som behöver bearbetas. Att då på efterlajvminglet kunna prata med andra om vad era roller råkat ut för är både roligt och skönt. Rollen och du är inte samma, ni är olika.

Din roll behöver alltså ha andra drag än du; en annan personlighet, bakgrund, andra färdigheter, en annan mimik, ett förändrat kroppsspråk. Det är alla olika knep som du kan använda för att berätta för andra, och för dig själv, att du faktiskt bara spelar en roll nu- det här är inte du.

Även om du skrivit och spelat en roll som är olik dig själv, så kan du uppleva det som kallas för Bleed efter ett lajv; det innebär helt enkelt att du har känslor kvar efter lajvet som egentligen hörde till din roll. Det är inget konstigt! Du har precis ägnat flera dagar åt att programmera om hjärna och kropp till att reagera på andra personer (roller), du har upplevt en massa, fått känna en mängd känslor- och helt plötsligt bryts allt. Om du fortfarande känner dig avigt inställd till dina inlajvfiender, eller har det där lilla pirret i magen vid tanke på din inlajvromans så kan det kännas skönt att få prata med spelarna efter lajvet (antingen på plats eller på internet). Tacka dem för att de lajvat mot dig, prata om de scener ni spelat och lär känna personen bakom rollen.

Din roll är spelbar. De flesta erfarna lajvare har nog gjort misstaget att någon gång skapa en roll som är för mycket; för ond, för glad, för skicklig, för olik en själv…För att orka hela lajvet behöver du en roll som är olik dig själv på några punkter (namn, bakgrund, dräkt, mimik, personlighet) men som ändå är nog lik dig för att du ska orka spela. Jag gjorde en gång misstaget att spela en magiker som var för ond; inom en dag hade jag gjort av med all min energi på att spela antagonist mot andra, gjort av med alla elaka saker att göra och var rätt less. Det är ok att göra fel, du kan fixa till det! (tex genom att dö, försvinna eller ändra sin roll med hjälp av arr).

Din roll är lagom svår. Hänger ihop med ovan; men här tänker jag på dina verkliga färdigheter. Om du ska spela en roll med otrolig kondition, skogsvana och vakenhet, så kommer du få ett fysiskt tungt lajv om du vill spela trovärdigt, det kan till och med vara läge att konditionsträna innan lajvet för att orka med att ha roligt (true story…) Spelar du en skicklig bågskytt är det bra att träna med båge några gånger innan lajvet, så du vet hur du hanterar den. Spelar du skrivare, träna med ditt bläck hemma så du vet hur man gör och inte förstör fina dokument. Lajv handlar om att låtsas och att spela, men samtidigt att göra det så pass trovärdigt att du bjuder andra på en upplevelse (jämför med första inlägget och hitta en balans).

Foto från Eterna, Sagors Slut 2014. Här står jag och är en hård skogslevande krigare.

Också med skavsår, träningsvärk och en stukad vrist. Ibland är det hårt att lajva…

Din roll har Intrigöppningar (se även spelyta i del 1). En roll som bott hela sitt liv i ett hus, ensam i skogen och inte har några mål med livet är väldigt svår att erbjuda ett roligt spel. En roll med familj, en förlorad barndomsvän, borttappad skatt, med 2 fiender och ett mål att bli borgmästare däremot- här finns det massor av intrigöppningar för arrangörerna, och andra medspelare, att skapa intressant spel på. Kom ihåg att du som spelare inte behöver skriva in alla detaljer, om det delas ut personliga intriger så kan du be om en fiende, en barndomsvän, gammal bekant osv. En roll blir alltid bättre om den passar in i den fiktiva världen, bland lajvets övriga roller och med din spelidé.

På ett krigslajv kan du spela veteran utan att behöva vara hårdast; andra halvan av lajvet är också krigsveteraner.

Var ärlig med dig själv och arrangörerna. Är ditt största mål på lajvet att uppleva äventyr? Att vara cool? Exempel: Att spela en ny soldatrekryt ger dig möjlighet att möta spel med skräck, upphetsning, spänning eller rädsla. Är du däremot en gammal krigsveteran kommer äventyren rullas upp framför dig utan att du låter dig imponeras, du har ju redan sett allt förr. Ditt kalla handlande och din lugna min får däremot de nya rekryterna att se upp till dig. Bägge spelupplevelserna har sina fördelar; be arrangörerna om hjälp med att välja en roll som passar den upplevelse du vill ha på lajvet.

På mitt första lajv spelade jag piga, fast jag egentligen trodde att jag ville vara soldat. Arrangörerna var genier! Jag blev omhändertagen på värdshuset, fick mat och en varm sovplats, och kunde uppleva allt fantastiskt med lajv och låta mig imponeras, skrämmas och råka ut för äventyr.

Har du redan provat väpnade roller? En grupp utan vapen måste lösa sina intriger på andra sätt. Och behöver andra egenskaper…

När du har lajvat ett tag kanske du blir sugen på att utforska dina begränsningar och utmana dig själv, eller spela roller som vidgar din förståelse för andra. Gör gärna det! Jag har valt roller som är modigare, pratar mer, eller har andra mål än mig själv och därigenom utvecklats både som spelare och medmänniska. Många lajvare provar också andra upplevelser genom att byta status (högre eller lägre) att spela på handikapp (stumhet, skador, enhänt osv) eller att prova nya relationer (kärlek, lojalitet, familjeband).

Att lyckas göra en Bra Roll är inte lätt, och du kommer kanske inte att lyckas på ditt första lajv, eller ens varje lajv när du väl är erfaren. Det gör ju inget det heller- det fina med lajv är ju att du kan försöka igen och prova nya saker hela tiden!

Foto från Skuggsagor 2020, Tinah Ekwall. Ett handelshus innehåller många olika roller att utforska.

 

 


4 Comments

Thoughts on making medieval garments

I wanted to share some thoughts with you today; things I have learned and things I find important, when I design medieval clothing. Both for myself and for customers. Being new in any branch of historical reenacting or costuming can be overwhelming, and just like with all other things in life there’s no simple answers or an ultimate guide. “Just read this book, and then you will know everything”… I haven’t found it at least.

But don’t feel overwhelmed! It is such an interesting journey you have ahead, exploring and experiencing other times and new handcrafting. And there’s lots of others that love to share their knowledge in this field as well. Here’s some great things I have learned over the years, that I like to share whenever I can!

Choosing materials is clearly one of the more difficult things when starting with historical handcrafting, and often the simplest way to succeed in making a good outfit is to pay the price for good material, and buy the same as everyone else. Seems boring at frist, right? But instead of wanting to make that perfect deal on super cheap wool in a really unique colour; think about what historical look you want to achieve with your outfit, and what qualities you would like the garment to have.

The places that sells fabrics especially to reenactors often produce high quality fabrics, and their customers will come back to buy more if they like it. The chance will also be that they are knowledgeable in historical fabrics so you can find materials, colours and qualities that resembles the historical originals, whilst giving you a fabric that will last for a long time to an affordable price.

The quality of the fabric will differ with manufacturers, places of origin, type of material etc so make sure to read up a bit on what material would be good for your individual project. Look at what others say about the seller and the different fabrics they offer, and learn some useful words: tabby and twill are weaving techniques, and twill is often more stretchy. Felted means the fabric has been fulled and is often less stretchy, but more weather resistant and smooth. Thin, medium and heavy are different weights in wool fabrics, whereas 120 grams etc are the weight of a m2 fabric.

Fabric shopping at The historical fabric store

It is always best to be able to see and feel the fabric yourself, and now when we stay at home, fabric samples are a good choice. If you have friends, a group or other people around you that are good at different fabrics, ask them for advise (or use a forum online) and always state what kind of garment you would like to make (a kirtle) for what period (14th century) and for what kind of use (reenactment event during winter etc). That way you may save both money and effort instead of buying the first fabric you find, and then get disappointed.

Preparation of fabric

Wool and Linen

I always prewash fabrics before sewing, even for my customers. I know that many in the field claim that you can’t wash wool fabrics in water, but that’s just bullsh*t. Of course you can wash fabrics, at least good ones. Bad ones? Might shrink uneven, get to much wear or completely change the look, feel and even the colour in contact with water. But you know what? That is not ok for garment fabrics. They should be made to endure everyday wear and wet weather, washing, food stains and so on. Those things totally existed in the medieval ages, it would be strange if your medieval outfit couldn’t endure the same right?

Furthermore, prewashing fabrics will release the weaving tension in the warp, making it shrink slightly and give you the fall it will have after ironing/washing/a rainstorm. You could get the same result by steaming the fabric with an iron before sewing, but that won’t remove the…

Chemicals and anti-mold treatments. Fabric today needs to last for longer times during shipping and warehousing, and look good when arriving on the shelf in the fabric store. To achieve this most fabrics (and ready made garments) are treated with different kind of chemicals, which will wash out in the washing process. Or rub of on your body… Not a good thought, right? Always prewash your fabrics!

Linen: soak in water a while before washing, to get a smoother fabric. Not necessary, but worth it. Fold it loosely in the bathtub for example. Wash the wet fabric in 40- 60 degrees C (the temperature you would like to wash your linen shift/shirt in later) hang to dry and then iron on a high temperature.

Wool: wash by hand or use the wool setting in the washing machine. Use cold to luke warm water and wool detergent. If you don’t have that, use a little shampoo, because wool is hair, and will not look its best after strong detergents. Also, hot water might felt it and make it look dull.

Silk and silk velvets are the only fabrics I don’t wash before use, but rather iron very gently and hang out to air before use.

This dress has been washed several times in water, and still looks like new.

Which thread?

Thats depends on what fabric you want to use, and what you want to make. But I prefer natural materials and “same for same”: silk for silk fabric, linen threads for linen, and wool for wool fabrics. Oh, or silk and linen for wool fabrics too, because that is a historical choice and very easy to work with. If you prefer to use a sewing machine, cotton thread for linen and silk for wool garments work nice. Polyester thread is a bit to “sharp” and might lead to breakage in the fabric rather than the seam if you happen to get stuck in something with your garment. But yeah, it will work on a sewing machine if that is what you have, I just don’t recommend it.

Where to start?

It is always good to start with underwear like shirt, shift and breeches. They will make up the base, are often easier to make and linen is not as expensive as wool. Also, you’ll get to try out the fit, the seams and some techniques.

After that, it is more a question of what you need versus what you are inspired to start with. Remember, handcrafting should be fun and not only practical! I like to make a middle/base layer next, often in wool, to be worn on warm events or when I work. After this is done, I adjust and finish of necklines at under-garments so they are not visible (if that is not fashionable) and start with some accessories, and another layer for warmth and weather protection. The medieval period (and others too) often have an outfit made up of several layers, and that is really practical when going to outdoor events!

Wearing a thin wool gown on a summer event. Photo taken by Catrine Lilja Kanon

Other good tips is to make a mock up or toile, basically a try out on the garment you desire, made in a cheap/recycled cotton fabric. It might seem as you are doing the work twice, but this is really handy as you get to try out the pattern, fit and look on the garment without risking that really expensive fabric. And if the mock up gets really good, you just pick apart the basted seams and use it as a pattern!

Basting is also a good investment; long running stitches will hold together your fabric pieces enough for a final fit before sewing, and will make it both faster and easier to sew all the seams by hand. I will confess, when I started sewing medieval clothing I NEVER basted anything and rarely pinned the seams, but after several surprises (Whot, how come I got this fit?) I learned it was both better and faster to check the fit, before sewing the final seams…

How to decide on social class and status?

Ohh, don’t ask me, I always change between working class garments and fancy party outfits depending on the event, place and what I feel like… But generally, just go for whatever catches your fancy! Or pick clothing after your preferred activities; are you going to stroll around a market fair with friends? Visit a fancy banquet? Or do you prefer mud wrestling, archery, beer taverns or outdoor cooking? Not only will you look much better with the right kind of clothing, you will also find that your activities will be much more fun with the right garments! A short dress and practical hood for the forest archery, or a thin and cool kirtle with hose for the indoor festivities.

A well of working class doublet, perfect for active events…

And a silk brocade doublet for those fancy strolls in the garden

Garments you need

This is always a tricky question, as it depends on the weather, the type of event and the gender and social status you want to portray. I thought I did great at my first events wearing a linen tunic, shoes and a cloak, I neither froze to much or died, but nowadays I confess of having higher standards… Like, I want to both look like I fit in the historical context, being comfy, not getting to much mosquito bites, and not freeze during chilly evenings. I also like to change my linen underwear everyday to feel fresh, as well as having some change of outer wear/dresses just because I feel like it. Oh, now I’m babbling again. You would never guess hom much text I always have to delete because of babbling…

Getting dressed in the morning; linen shift, wool hose and leather turnshoes

1. You generally need linen underwear, and a change for longer events. Several changes, if you’re not going to wash the clothes during the event. We want to look medieval, not smell medieval…

2. A thin or medium warm wool layer for summer events, for working or for indoor events.

3. An outer layer for cold evenings, if you get wet or want to look well dressed. I recommend another layer of kirtle/dress/coat rather than a cloak to get more use out of your clothing.

4. Headwear like hats, veils, hoods etc. Both to complete the outfit estetically, but also because it gives you cover from weather and bugs.

5. Shoes! Don’t forget shoes, make or buy a pair that is looking good and feels comfortable. Hose (long or short) with thin leather soles is also workable on warm events, paired with pattens.

6. Accessories, both fancy and practical: belt, garters, bags, purses, cloaks, headwear, gloves… You name it. These can really set the style and time period, so check out sources before you decide on what to add to complete your outfit!

A 15th c outfit in 3 layers; shift, middle kirtle and overdress complete with shoes, headwear and accessories.

Wear it!

Historical clothing should be worn, because it is awesome and comfy and look great… You know that you’re allowed to wear it around the house right? Or take the great cloak for that chilly walk, or use the apron when doing gardening work. You shouldn’t need to be super careful with your garments, they will look even better when you have worn them a couple of times. My favourite shift is 6 years old and worn transparent thin over my shoulders and back after months of wearing, but I love it.

And make it last longer:

If you have long skirts, fold them up or pull them up into your belt when walking so you don’t step on the hem, or drag it through mud. That will make the fabric last longer. Protect the handsewn leather turnshoes with pattens when walking through rain or mud, and always mend holes and rips as soon as you find them on your garments. At the end of season, I always wash, mend, air and look through all my garments before putting them into the wardrobe. For this year though, I recommend taking them out for airing a time or two to avoid dust and bugs.

Getting dressed in historical clothing is actually a bit different than getting dressed in your favourite comfy pants and tshirt. If you are used to wearing stretchy clothing, you will need to be a bit more careful getting dressed and undressed with the woven natural fibres. Imagine it more like a suit, pull it carefully over your head, always open lacing and buttons before removing the garment, and never “jump” into your medieval joined hose. Another tip to make your hose last longer is to always pull them up before kneeling or sitting, and to wear garters under the knee to make them stay in place.

Early 14th c outfit with accessories

Yeah, I think I got the most parts down here, and it became quite the long blog post. Maybe I am tired of sitting at home, talking to the cats and love all the time? Who am I kidding? I am REALLY tired of sitting at home, I miss events, adventures and being able to go out and do fun stuff. But most of all, I miss you friends, readers and fellow history-travelers! Stay safe and take care so we can meet each other soon!

Love, L


Leave a comment

Åka på lajv del 3: Lajvdräkten

I de två tidigare delarna har jag talat om spelteknik och gett er mina bästa packtips, nu tänkte jag prata lite om det jag tycker är roligast innan lajv; dräktskapandet. Förutom att jag tycker om att sy och skapa med händerna, ger lajvdräkter ofta möjlighet till att vara kreativ och att lägga till delar i dräkten som ska vara kommunikativa.

This blogpost is in Swedish like the ones before, but might be of interest to the international larping scene too. To translate, you will have to copypaste this into google translate. Feel free to do so if you would like to read it! (Sorry, as Swedish is my native language these posts were much faster to make in Swedish. Which gives me more time for the tutorials to get translated, I guess?)

Foto från Eterna; Trons makt, 2013 på shaolerna. Att vara lika skapar ofta samhörighet och kommunicerar grupptillhörighet.

Men vi börjar från början.

På de allra flesta lajv behöver du en lajvdräkt, som ska följa lajvvärldens dräktkrav för den roll du skulle vilja spela. Att komma utan dräkt är inget alternativ, så du kommer behöva låna/hyra/sy/leta/göra en dräkt som passar åtminstone till lajvets lägsta krav (oftast enkla raka plagg i bomull, linne och ull) men helst vill man ha en dräkt som också passar till rollens folkslag, kön, status, personlighet och uppgift.

Var kan man hitta dräkter till medeltid/vikingatid/fantasylajv?

Sy själv, köp begagnat på köp/säljsidor på internet (ex fb) låna/hyr av andra lajvare (föreningar och arrangörsgrupper erbjuder ibland alternativ), leta delar på secondhand (ex enkla vita skjortor, strumpor, yllebyxor, filtar), köp på internet från sidor som säljer färdigproducerat, eller beställ av personer (som mig) som syr på beställning åt andra.

Olika folkslag; olika dräkter gör det enkelt för lajvare att spela mot varandra utan att behöver lära sig vad alla spelar utantill.

Vad behöver man?

Det skiljer så mycket mellan olika lajv/kampanjer/tider på året så det går inte att säga något generellt. Men tänk gärna lager; linne underst, sedan ett eller flera lager ull beroende på väder. Skor som passar, samt accessoarer, regnskydd och tillbehör. Testa den tänkta dräkten utomhus, flera veckor innan lajvet.

Vad kostar det?

Du kan hitta en komplett lajvdräkt begagnat för 300 spänn. Eller beställa en helt ny med extra lyx-allt för 10 000 kr. Det är svårt att ge ett bestämt svar, så bestäm dig hellre för en budget och jobba utifrån den, eller börja att samla på dig tyg/delar under vintern för att ha bra kläder klara till sommaren. Jag har sällan kommit under 1000 kr för en dräkt (jag gjort själv, samt köpt in begagnade delar till).

Var hittar jag material och rekvisita?

På internet; idag finns det massor av bra tyg och rekvisitasidor på internet som säljer enbart till lajvare och liknande intressen. När jag började köpte vi tyg på loppis, gjorde egna vapen genom att slakta gamla liggunderlag och löste många problem med tejp. Idag kan du som lajvare välja dräkt, svärd och tillbehör efter genre; alv, steampunk, 1500tal, möjligheterna är oändliga! Men var lite misstänksam, en tysk sida som säljer lajvvapen superbilligt kanske inte har nog höga säkerhetskrav för att tillåtas på svenska lajv. Och alvmanteln på w*sh är förmodligen sydd i billig syntet, smälter om den utsätts för gnistor och håller inte värmen. Ställ frågor, prata på forum, kolla med lajvet du vill åka på innan du köper. Längst ner på Tutorials här på bloggen hittar du shoppingguider.

Var hittar jag hantverksbeskrivningar och inspiration?

Åter igen på internet! Pinterest, Youtube, bloggar, filmer, serier… ofta har lajvet en egen hemsida med information och egen inspiration. Börja därifrån och leta vidare. Det finns till exempel massvis med filmer som beskriver hur du sminkar dina alvöron bra. På den här bloggen hittar du massor med gratis sömnadsbeskrivningar för att sy egna plagg.

Foto från Eterna; Trons makt 2013, en av de dräkter jag skapat som jag känt mig mest nöjd med. Att lyckas med att kombinera praktisk, och tydligt kommunikativ är inte alltid enkelt, men ger en bra effekt på lajv.

Det var grundnivån; nu tänkte jag prata om hur du får din lajvdräkt att gå från “godkänd” till “fantastisk”. Fundera igenom punkterna här under; och anteckna dina ideér:

(Som exempel tänkte jag använda rollen från mitt senaste lajv, en mörkeralv som tillhörde en historisk japansk/koreanskt inspirerad kultur. Hon föddes in i rikedom och ett bekvämt leverne, och är politiskt bildad. Det blev ingen fantastisk dräkt kanske, men den uppfyller alla punkterna!)

Rollen Arquen Araki Meiyuri, elgarinsk mörkeralvsadel.

Lajvvärlden/kampanjens förutsättningar: vad anger lajvet att du behöver för att spela en viss roll? (Exempel: Elgarin är japansk/koreansk influerade. Dräkten ska vara svart och blå/svart och lila. Håret svart/mörkt, hyn bleksminkad, öronen spetsiga.)

Rollens bakgrund och personlighet: vad har rollen gjort tidigare i sitt liv, var kommer den ifrån? Vildmarken eller storstaden? Är den praktiskt lagd, eller rik? Äger den viktiga personliga saker såsom smycken, förfädernas svärd, en helig sten? (Exempel: vida ärmar som gör praktiskt arbete obekvämt, komplicerad frisyr som passar hov och stadsliv, dyra smycken.)

Genus/kön: ibland anger lajvet att olika dräkter gäller för olika kön/genus, ibland kopplar de enbart dräkt till funktion. Är du mest bekväm i byxor eller kjol? Eller vad passar din roll bäst? (Exempel: vi valde genusneutral klädsel och hade alla tunika, byxor och lång kimono i gruppen. Dels för att skapa enighet, dels för att markera att genus inte var intressant för oss att spela på.)

Ibland är det mer intressant att vara lika, än att vara olika

Estetik: titta på massor av bilder/inspiration innan du börjar skapa din dräkt. Vilken stil? Vilket formspråk? Vilka plagg används? Vilka färger/toner/nyanser? (Exempel: jag samlade bilder från kulturerna vi skulle inspireras av, och valde en japansk frisyr, kimonos inspirerade av historiska plagg, raka siluetter, höga midjor och detaljer som är asiatiskt influerade.)

Praktiskt: materialval är viktigt. Linne andas och är svalt, ylle värmer. Välj bekväma skor i skinn som du kan gå i en hel helg. (Exempel: underst hade flera av oss underställ, sedan byxor i ull eller linne och en tunika. Kimonon syddes i ett varmt ylletyg eftersom lajvet var på hösten.)

Färg: har oftast symboliska betydelser i lajvvärlden, men kan också användas som allmän färgkodning. Svart/rött/lila används ofta för att signalera ondska eller magi, djupa färger (mörkblå, lila, vinrött) för att signalera rikedom, skogsfärger (grönt,grått,brunt) för att signalera naturfolk eller skogsvana roller. (Exempel: färgerna var redan valda på förhand i lajvvärlden, men de svarta dräkterna hjälpte oss med att framstå som lite onda, snobbiga och osympatiska)

svart är en enkel färg att använda om du vill spela ond eller osympatisk

Symboler och symboliska tillbehör: med symboler menar jag både sådant som används i lajvkampanjen ifråga. Till exempel religiösa symboler, men också saker som används för att beskriva grupptillhörighet såsom spetsiga öron på alver, synligt smink på adel. Symboliska tillbehör förstärker delar av din roll. Den praktiska livvakten kanske har ett kortare svärd, den mäktiga krigaren ett långt svärd och rustning, lönnmördaren dolda knivar i dräkten. Egentligen är det samma typ av föremål (ett vasst vapen till för att dräpa andra) men du skulle inte gärna kunna byta plats på föremålen utan att de förlorar sin trovärdighet. (Exempel: solfjädern påminner både om kulturell inspiration men ger också rollen en känsla av rik, bortskämd och någon som inte arbetar.)

Patinering: ska din roll vara ren, eller smutsig? Att medvetet fläcka ner, förstöra och laga din dräkt ger en känsla av trovärdighet. Jag har skrivit mer om patinering och hur du gör i tidigare inlägg på bloggen, till exempel de här: (Exempel: håret borstades varje dag för att förstärka en ordnad känsla.)

Gör lajvdräkten trovärdig- om patinering

Patinera ditt plagg- steg för steg

 

Val av plagg: praktiska plagg signalerar en rörlig roll, kanske spejare, arbetare, bonde, krigare. Långa kåpor, mantlar, rockar kan betyda rikedom, hög status eller helighet/magiska utövare. Mängd tyg symboliserar ofta rikedom, såsom vida ärmar, breda byxor. Hattar och huvudbonader är tacksamma för att förstärka en dräkt; en magiker, religiös ledare, kung/drottning, en rik handelsman… Titta gärna på vad som används i dagens kultur/film/serier/konst och lajvifiera/skapa fritt efter dessa. Det ökar möjligheten att andra lajvare förstår vad du vill kommunicera med din roll. (Exempel: långa kimonos med långa ärmar signalerar status, bekvämlighet, rikedom). Men de påverkar också kroppshållningen och rörelserna till att bli långsammare, mer noggranna och innebär att varje arbetsuppgift inleds med att ärmen flyttas undan, och sedan rättas till igen.

rättar till kragen

Sist av allt; ingen föds till en expert på att göra lajvdräkter! Till mitt första lajv sydde jag en underklänning av ett lakan (förlåt mamma!) och en grön linneklänning med vida ärmar… till rollen som piga. Tillsammans med en brun mantel och stallskorna utgjorde det här mer eller mindre hela min dräkt, och jag både överlevde och fick mersmak. Vad jag ville säga? Våga börja sy!


Leave a comment

Åka på lajv del 2: Praktiska tips och packning

Förra gången skrev jag om spelteknik och nu tänkte jag bli mer praktisk genom att skriva om själva packningen, och allt du behöver ha med dig. 360 graderslajvande (den vanligaste typen av lajvande i Sverige?) innebär att du både omger dig med saker, spelar i en miljö och bär kläder som passar till lajvvärlden, vilket gör lajv till något av en prylsport. Men det är också det som gör lajvandet så speciellt; en omedelbar förflyttning till en helt annan värld.

This post is in Swedish since I am addressing the Swedish larping scene, which differs from other countries.

Jag har publicerat inlägg tidigare på bloggen som handlar om packlistor och packning, och de kan du återfinna här:

Förvaring på lajv och medeltidsevent; påsar, säckar och en hemmagjord ryggsäck

Min första lajvpackning, eller hur du undviker att frysa när du sover

Du kan också skriva in “lajv” i sökrutan för alla inlägg på svenska som handlar om lajv, eller klicka i kategorin “larping/lajv” för mer lajvrelaterat.

Det första du behöver veta, är förstås vad du ska använda din packning till. Var ska du? Hur länge ska du vara borta? Och vilka regler gäller på det lajv du ska åka till? Att skapa en helt generell lista är väldigt svårt, eftersom mycket av packningen varierar med roll (exempelvis dräkt, vapen, tillbehör) boende (tält, inomhus, kallt, varmt) och hur du ska lajva (svår terräng med mygg eller i en herrgård med serverad mat).

Foto från lajvet Nordanil där jag arbetade i köket; här fanns all köksutrustning redan på plats!

Du kan dela upp din packning i två delar: det du behöver för att sköta om dig själv och orka lajva, och det du behöver för att kunna delta i lajvet och göra en bra rollprestation.

Exempel del 1:
vatten + mugg
mat + tillagningskärl + matskål
filtar + varma strumpor + tält

Exempel del 2:
rollens dräkt
vapen eller annan rekvisita

Var inte rädd för att fråga andra lajvare, arrangörer och internet efter fler tips. Jag spenderade mina första 10+ lajv med att frysa under nätterna och sova dåligt innan jag lärde mig att hålla värmen utomhus under yllefilten, och hur jag skulle packa för att åstadkomma det. Lösningen? Att äta och dricka mer än jag brukar, samt att sova med underställ, mössa, strumpor, och täcke under filten.

Foto på Becky som spelade handlare; här behövdes mycket kläder att sälja (inlajv eller på riktigt)

Här kommer packlistorna som jag brukar använda mig av:

Sovplatsen:
lager 1: liggunderlag/fältsäng/uppblåsbar madrass
lager 2: får eller renskinn
lager 3: sovpåse i form av en hopsydd, stor yllefilt med ett duntäcke/sovsäck i + kudde

lager 4: extra filt om det är kallare

Närmast kroppen: underställ, mössa, tjocka strumpor. Om du vill se inlajv ut; det går bra att sova i lajvkläder, väl mjuka yllekläder. Tänk på att du behöver ett ombyte ifall du blir blöt under dagen.

Bra tips: myggnät att hänga upp för att slippa mygg, har du inget nät fungerar ett tunt bomullstyg bra att hänga över ansiktet. Öronproppar för att sova ostört. En hätta är bra för värme+myggskydd.

Tänk på: marken kyler, hoppa inte över skinnen som skyddar dig mot markkylan. Ullfiltarna skyddar mot kvällsfukten som kyler ner din sovplats, men också mot eld. Ersätt inte yttersta lagret ull med syntetfibrer, om ett ljus eller gnistor skulle falla över din sovplats.

Moderna saker:

Necessär med tandborste, hudkräm, ev mediciner och annat som används till vardags (man mår bra av att få borsta tänderna och ta hand om sig själv)
Skavsårsplåster, sårtvätt, handsprit, våtservetter, toapapper.

Mobil, kamera i en plastpåse.

Mat:

Välj den mat som du vet att du gillar, och packa lite mer än du äter hemma. Nu ska energin räcka till massor av äventyr och att hålla dig varm. Det är helt ok att förbereda matlådor att värma på plats, gör det bara diskret om det räknas som modern mat som lasagne.
Frukostmat som jag gillar + kaffe + kanna att koka upp vatten i på elden.
Lunch och middag i form av enkla rätter, piroger, paj som kan ätas kall, en snabb soppa eller dyl.

Vatten, minst 6 liter/dygn (om inte det finns på området). Tänk på att du behöver både dricksvatten, tvätt och diskvatten.

Snacks ifall du blir trött och hungrig; frukt, kex, torkad frukt, godis…

Kärl att laga mat i, slev, skärbräda… Allt du behöver för att laga mat, samt matsaker för att äta. Testa gärna hemma först om du aldrig provat att laga mat över öppen eld. Kolla med arrangemanget om det finns eldstäder, ved osv eller om du behöver ordna det själv.

Tips: både filtar, skinn, grytor och träskålar kan man hitta på loppisar billigt om man är beredd att leta. Börja flera månader innan du tänkt åka på lajv för att hinna förbereda din packning utan att den blir alltför dyr.

Tips: mat håller en hel helg med hjälp av kyla. Kylbag gömd i en säck, kylklampar, frusna matlådor, frusna vattenflaskor är bra alternativ.

Matlagning under ett SCAevent (medeltida läger) med massor av bra lägerutrustning synligt.

Packning:

Prova gärna packa några dagar innan lajvet för att se om du kan bära allting, kontrollera att du inte glömt skaffa något samt fundera på hur allt kan packas så bra som möjligt. Ska du bära långt kan en fjällryggsäck vara bra, men om du skaffar lajviga säckar och väskor så slipper du gömma saker på lajvet.

Boende:

Fråga arrangörerna om boende ingår eller går att köpa till/hyra, om du inte har ett eget inlajvigt tält eller kan dela med andra i en grupp. Tänk på att historiska tält är både dyra, tunga att bära och kräver skötsel, så blir du inbjuden att bo i någon annans tält så erbjud dem en slant som tack, hjälp till med att bära och ta med kakor att bjuda på. Då kanske du blir inbjuden igen… En del sover offlajv (utanför lajvets område) av olika skäl (har inget bra tält, vill åka hem och sova, sjukdomar osv) men då missar man en del av lajvet.

Transport:

De flesta lajv äger rum ute i skogen, så du behöver ta bilen dit. Vissa arrangemang erbjuder upphämtning av deltagare på stationer/busshållplatser. Ett annat alternativ är att samåka med andra. Planera hur du ska ta dig till och från lajvet flera veckor innan start; om du behöver matsäck samt boka hämtning eller samåkning med andra. Om någon erbjuder dig plats i bil; skicka en bild/beskrivning på hur mycket packning du har och fråga om den får plats- gör den inte det behöver du fundera på andra alternativ. Erbjud dig också att betala mer än bara din del i bensinen, föraren står ju faktiskt för hela bilen, kör den och hämtar/lämnar dig också på en plats.

Gruppen bestämde sig för gula västar för att visa att vi hörde ihop, längst ned till vänster i bild är vår nyanställde vakt som ännu inte fått en väst…

innan han förrådde oss!

Kläder:

En dräkt som passar till den roll du ska spela… men som också passar till tiden på året och vilken temperatur det kan vara. Som ett exempel har jag under flera år åkt på lajv i juli utanför Skellefteå, och där har temperaturer uppmätts på mellan +5 till +30 grader. Du behöver flera lager, och gärna ett ombyte om du blir blöt. Jag brukar försöka ha med mig två skjortor/tunikor i linne och sedan lager på lager med ullkläder. Som nybörjare känns det dyrt att köpa ulltyger till dräkten, men det kommer göra din lajvupplevelse bättre och är kläderna välsydda så kan du alltid sälja dem efter lajvet, för att köpa in tyg till nya dräkter…

Där har du min dräktkarriär i en mening, att sälja gamla kläder har gjort att jag har kunnat bekosta nya projekt och utvecklats. Om du inte vill sy själv, så säljer många lajvare begagnade kläder för billiga summor. Ett alternativ som är vanligt i andra länder är att du beställer dräkt av någon som syr upp lajv/historiska kläder på beställning. Du kan få exakt den dräkt du vill ha, i dina mått och med ett bra andrahandsvärde om du sedan vill sälja och köpa nytt.

Min första dräkt till kampanjerollen Sari, fotat 2006. Det är med skräckblandad skäms-känsla jag tittar på de här bilderna nu.

Hur tänkte jag överleva i skogen i 3 dagar iförd höftskynke, linnetunika och väst? Jag hade tur den gången, det varm varmt och soligt nästan hela lajvet.

Tips: kom ihåg underkläder och flera par strumpor.

Bra att veta: många lajv har krav på vilken typ av dräkt/färg/stil du ska välja till olika roller. Tänk på det när du väljer roll så du är säker på att du kan göra/få tag på rätt dräkt till lajvet. Många lajv hjälper nybörjare med att hitta/låna/sy/hyra dräkt till sitt första lajv- fråga arrangörerna.

Idag finns mycket gratis sömnadsbeskrivningar, filmer på Youtube och inspiration att hitta på Pinterest. Hur skulle din ultimata dräkt se ut till en viss roll?

Tänk på: att hitta/skapa en bra dräkt tar mycket tid och kostar pengar, men kommer också ge dig en bättre upplevelse och skapa rätt stämning för andra. Med hjälp av dräkten kan du visa andra spelare om din roll är rik, mäktig, ond, magisk, tillhör en viss grupp…

Mer om att skapa lajvdräkter finns här på bloggen, sök på “lajv” eller “lajvdräkt” i bloggens sökfält.

Samma roll, fast 2013 (längst ut till höger) byxor i ull och skinn, kjortel och handskar i skinn, kappa i ull och päls. Lite äldre, mycket klokare. 

Rekvisita och tillbehör:

Eftersom lajv är en aktivitet som man gör för sin egen skull men också med respekt för andra, så är rekvisita en viktig del av din och andras upplevelser. Många arrangörer lägger massor av resurser på att skapa bra miljöer, coola monster, fina skatter… du behöver inte vara sämre!
Olika typer av rekvisita:

  1. Skapa din roll och kommunicera vad du spelar till andra. Exempel: magikerstav, svärd och sköld, nycklar, heliga påsar, slevar och grytor- välj det som din roll borde äga!
  2. Rekvisita som inbjuder till spel. Exempel: en helig amulett (som kan stjälas), hemliga brev (som kan smygläsas) en förbjuden dolk (som kan hittas) är saker som du kan ta med eller plantera ut på lajvet. Hittar du/tar du andras rekvisita under lajvet förväntas du alltid ge tillbaka det direkt efter lajvet. Annars är det ju faktiskt stöld enligt svensk lag.
  3. Rekvisita som skapar miljö/stämning: Exempel: ljusstakar, dukar, möbler, flaggor, prydnadssaker, smycken, tavlor… Allt som inte behövs eller ska spelas med, men som förstärker upplevelsen för dig själv och andra.

Mysbelysning skapar stämning

Till dina första lajv kommer du förmodligen inte dra med dig så mycket saker; de flesta är rätt överväldigade när de börjar lajva och nöjda om de kommit ihåg Både mat, sovplats och kläder. Mången är den lajvare som drömt mardrömmar inför ett lajv om att anlända utan svärdet eller dräkten (och en del har gjort just detta).

Men gå gärna runt innan och efter ett lajv, hälsa på olika grupper och kolla hur de bor och vad de valt att ta med sig för att förstärka stämningen och sin grupp. Fota eller skriv inspirationslistor till framtida lajv, eller inspireras av miljöer i filmer.

Innan lajv är det fantastiskt att komma så tidigt som möjligt. Då hinner du se dig omkring på området, träffa medspelare och kanske komma överens om roligt spel med andra. Efter lajvet stannar de flesta kvar några timmar för att mingla och fota, ta tillfället i akt att lära känna folk på riktigt. Fråga gärna om tips på dräkt, spel och gå fram till de som tillfört spel till ditt lajv och tacka. Beröm någons coola kläder, och hjälp sedan till att packa (först dina egna saker, sedan din grupps saker) och städa (din egen lägerplats, sedan hjälper man arrangörerna).

Vapen till salu, en fana, färgglada drycker i små flaskor. Ingenting är nödvändigt för att åka på lajvet, men allt bidrar till känslan!

Extra tips: gillar du inte att skriva listor? Fota istället dina grejer, utlagda på golvet, för att komma ihåg vad du har och hur du brukar packa det!


Leave a comment

Medieval pattens (research post)

I wanted to buy myself a pair of really nice wooden pattens to protect my handmade medieval shoes during events, like 6 years ago. I didn’t find any, so then I tried to trade for a pair with some woodworking friends, but non knew how to make a pair or didn’t want to, so I set out to fix my non-pattens-problem on my own. That took a while; and believe me, I have gone through some bad options before I ended up happy.

patinor

Making a wooden sole with a leather strap, and then put it on your foot seems like a simple task, but in the end I didn’t get it right before I researched the extant finds, looked at artwork and then tried making a pair with some serious hands-on experimenting. I wanted them to both look good, feel right and be comfortable to move in. Now I have finally made a pair I am satisfied with, so I wanted to share my research and process with you! Because of the amount of research, text and pictures I ended up with, I am splitting the posts into research and step-by-step. Easier to read!

Period: Europe, mainly 14th to 15th century.

About pattens

Pattens are a pair of soles with straps, to wear with your everyday medieval shoe to raise the foot above the ground, avoiding snow, dirt and water. Though they might look like sandals their purpose was to protect the wearer and the expensive shoes all year around, and the thick soles meant you came up from the ground, keeping you dry and warm as well as making the shoes last longer. Pattens were shaped after the foot and the leather shoe, changing form as the shoe fashion did.

They may also be referred to as clogs or galoshes, all names for a medieval overshoe meant to protect the leather shoe, though I will use the term pattens like Grew and Neergaard does in Shoes and Pattens. There are finds of pattens from the 12th and 13th century, making them an useful accessory for the medieval person. Finds of 14th century pattens in London are often decorated for the higher classes, and gets more common later in the century. In the 15th century they become increasingly popular, with many different models and variations. Lots of extant finds show this trend, as well as the pattens being frequently showed in contemporary art. Based on this knowledge, I decided to focus mainly on the late 14th and 15th century variations of pattens.

Materials and models

Pattens can be found with soles in joined layers of leather, as well as wood, and with a solid sole or a two-pieced variant, joined with leather almost like a hinge. Examples with a wooden platform on top of stilts or wedges in wood or metal can also be found.

Examples of wood being used in finds; alder, willow, poplar and one example of beech. Aspen was prohibited for use in England in 1416 (which tells us it was probably a popular choise) but 1464 it was stated that it was allowed to make pattens of aspen wood not suitable for arrowshafts (Shoes and Pattens).

15th and early 16th century pattens, both wood and layers of leather was used for soles.

Straps made of leather

All extant examples I have studied have straps made of leather (vegetable tanned cowhide seems to be the choice), though there are lots of different strap fastenings. Some pattens have one strap over the front part of the foot, almost like flip flops, while others also have straps at the sides or behind the heel, joining in a strap around the ankle. The heel straps can be first seen in late 14th century finds.

Looking at contemporary artwork, many working persons from the period wear practical pattens with a sturdy strap over the foot, while higher classes have more formed soles with delicate straps, sometimes decorated, and sometimes with a buckle.

To adjust the fit of the straps there are examples of metal buckles, ties and leather strips secured with a piece of leather or a nail among other varieties. The leather used for straps are generally thinner than the one used to join a split sole, and to make it sturdier a seam, a binding or a folded edge have been used. Two layers of leather sewn together is another method. The leather could be decorated with dyes or edges of contrasting colours and stamps or cut outs in patterns.

To fasten the leather to the soles iron nails were used, both for the straps and the sole hinge. Sometimes a second leather strap was nailed down around the sole to finish of the look and protect the foot straps from wear. Other words used for the nails are dubs, pins and pegs but I choose to follow the item descriptions on the online database of the Museum of London naming them nails. It also seems that the medieval examples have the same shape and size as nails to other kinds of work.

pattens2

Metal buckles and other fastenings

There are several examples of metal buckles represented in artwork on pattens from the 15th century, and finds from the 14th and 15th century of similar buckles made in iron, brass, bronze and copper allow to mention some examples. Because most buckles are found loose it is hard to say which ones was used for belts, shoes, pattens and purses. I opted for some examples from contemporary artwork to show you, and if you want to further examine buckles from the period there are lots of finds on online museum collections as well as in Dress Accessories.

Examples of metal buckles in contemporary artwork

There are several finds from sites in Europe like London and Amsterdam as well as examples from Germany. If you want to see more extant finds, Museum of London online collection is a great source to begin with.

Hugo van der Goes, The Portinari Altarpiece/Triptych, c 1475

Sources:

Grew and Neergaard (2001) Shoes and pattens p. 91-101

Egan and Pritchard (2002) Dress Accessories 1150-1450

Goubitz (2011) Stepping Through Time: archaeological footwear from prehistoric times until 1800.

Museum of London online collection (20200416) https://collections.museumoflondon.org.uk/online/search/#!/results?terms=medieval%20patten

Extant find at the top; Museum of London online collection. 15th c patten in wood with leather and iron nails.

A patten maker; (20200416) https://hausbuecher.nuernberg.de/75-Amb-2-317-106-v

patinor2


2 Comments

Early 14th century outfit

IMG_5536

This is my early 14th century outfit, hand stitched and made with inspiration from medieval manuscript sources, like the Luttrell Psalter from early 14th c England.

I made the dress for my video project and wanted to put together a whole outfit that would fit in the same time period. It turned out super comfy, maybe I could wear it instead of my comfy pants indoors..?

I also made it so it would be usable in the viking outfit if I would be in need of a thin woolen dress/kirtle under the apron dress. Hence the looser sleeves, shorter length and not so wide neckline. It is certainly not the most fashionable 14th c outfit, rather an outfit for work, like in my market stall. (Uhum, much suitable, very nice thinking there…)

IMG_5533

This dress will be featured in my online lecture about Medieval Dress (only in Swedish right now!) and as I know that many of you readers are Swedes or understand Swedish, I will post a link to the lecture here. For you non-Swedish speakers; I have not forgot you, and will strive to translate interesting parts of the video to English and post it on a Youtube channel in the future.

dress

Until then, here’s a list of the materials used in the outfit if you get interested in making your own.

What items do you need?

For my outfit in size small-medium, based on fabrics 150 cm width

  • Linen shift, 2 meters. Linen thread and bees wax for sewing.
  • Wool kirtle as the visible layer. 2,6-3 meters of wool fabric. Wool, linen or silk thread for sewing.
  • Birgitta cap + linen half circle veil. 60 cm thin linen. Thin linen thread and bees wax.
  • Linen apron. 100*80 cm of sturdy linen, linen thread and bees wax.
  • Wool hose/socks. Around 70*100 cm wool twill.
  • Leather turn shoes.
  • Garters in wool or silk for the hose. Fabric scraps, vowen ribbons or braids can be used.
  • Purse, here in brick stitched silk with silk tassels and a silk tablet woven band. Made by my friend Jenny!
  • Thin belt in leather or fabric.
  • Decorative brooch in brass with stones.
  • 3 dress pins in bronze.

14thcoutfit


Leave a comment

How to make a Herjolfnes pattern

herjolfnesintro

I promised you some insights into the Herjolfnes dresses with the many side gores, and here’s my take to understand the patterns!

(This guide is a “make it work for you” guide, if you want to make a dress as similar to the extant finds as possible, you might want to use the published materials mentioned below instead)

IMG_0283

First, if you have “Medieval Garments Reconstructed”, it might be fun to try these patterns out. But remember that these are just general patterns, and they are not made for your body, nor your measurements. The risk is therefore that they will not fit very well, and you will be kept wondering what to do with this new and mysterious pattern.

WP_20160701_09_01_30_Pro

Furthermore, the original clothing (and patterns) were made to a very different person, with a different life style than yours, a body marked by another way of living, and the clothes were being worn and as a last thing, used instead of coffins for the dead last rest. Translating these clothing into patterns is important to understand the general pattern construction, but after this I believe it to be more useful that the dress you finally make is going to fit you well.

To achieve this, I recommend you start with a personal pattern; a mock up or toile. Once you have this one, you can then transform it into a pattern with as few or many side gores as you wish. To demonstrate this I made a model in paper for you. You can try out this method in regular paper first if you want, or go straight for patterning paper and 1:1 modeling.

Step 1: The shadowed picture is my toile/mock up for my upper body. I have made a start pattern with the skirt attached to these (by the waist line) and two integrated gores; middle front and middle back. On my standard dress pattern my back piece is whole (no seam along the spine).

handcraftedhistoryherjolfnes3

Step 2: I cut the front and back out, along with a side gore. This is the pattern for my red cotehardie.

handcraftedhistoryherjolfnes4

Step 3: Time to go sideways! I mean sidegores… I mean, just cut the pattern pieces apart like I did here. I place the cut where the arm holes start to bend, or around 10 cm in from the sides. The bigger size, the bigger piece you will get.

handcraftedhistoryherjolfnes5

Step 4: Cut the side gore in half, and tape each half to the new side pieces.

handcraftedhistoryherjolfnes6

Step 5: To make it easier, I draw the new side pieces on a piece of paper, and add some width to the other “side” of the side gore; where it is straight. I don’t need a lot, between 30-40 cm on a full pattern.

handcraftedhistoryherjolfnes7

Step 6: The front and back pieces also gets added width at the bottom hem. It’s illustrated by the orange part on the picture. The width gets added to both front parts and back parts. This will give you pieces that has no straight vertical lines on the skirt, but flared lines resulting in a lot of hem (fancy!)

handcraftedhistoryherjolfnes8

Step 7: Now I have a pattern with added side gores, 2 on each side. The gores at the front and back pieces have been added as a part of the pattern to simplify, but you could also piece everything together.

CF= center front (where my lacing is on the green dress) and CB on this pattern means you will have a seam along the back, since the gore is integrated. You could also keep the back piece whole, and insert a gore in the middle. I will show you how I do this in another post. (Also note that I show you a half dress in these photos; when you do your dress there will of course be another half of dress too.)

handcraftedhistoryherjolfnes9

Step 8: Want more side gores? Not a problem! Repeat the cutting-party, and cut each of the side gores in two. Here I have done it on the front side gore. I recommend marking your pieces with front, back, and arrows to show where they belong, and I also keep my waist line (dotted line). It can get confusing otherwise…

After this, you can add more width at the hemline to each of the new gores, drawing out more width from the straight side like shown above. You can also add A Lot More Width as shown below, if you want to have a fancy dress with a great amount of fabric.

handcraftedhistoryherjolfnes10

Step 9: Very important. After you have cut all your pieces and redrawn them, it is time to add the seam allowance. Add 1,5-2 cm of seam allowance around all pieces, either on paper or directly on the fabric. If your starting mock up had seam allowance integrated, do not add more to those lines that you have not touched this time.

Step 10: Whoho, a new herjolfnes based pattern has emerged! Cut it out in mock up cotton fabric to try out the fit, or just do like I did and cut out all the pieces in wool, with a bit of extra seam allowance. Extra? Just to be able to baste the dress together and try out the fit + if you are satisfied with all the new side seams. I did not need the extra seam allowance, but I intend to use the photos to make even another tutorial on the subject of fitting a dress pattern.

Remember that the side seams are not “princess seams” which are put over the bust to give it a modern form. The herjolfnes seams are more on the side of the bust, and gives you movement, a good drape and lots of hem.

I made the sleeves based on a regular S-sleeve pattern I already had, and for this construction method you should not need to adjust the sleeves much (if you have a working pattern), just check so the armhole doesn’t get to wide; measure your seam allowance when making the dress, and then insert the sleeves after sewing all the side gores and front + back panel together.

handcraftedherjolfnesside

The finished dress in medium thick twill wool fabric. The dress is actually quite loose, and I cut the sleeves short, and the hem above the ground, to make it into a good working kirtle for historical markets.

The original herjolfnes patterns doesn’t have lacing, but I decided to add that and take in the dress a bit to get a fit I am comfortable with. I also hate pulling a tight dress over my head as I always mess up my hairdo and cap, so the laced ones are my favourites. Once again, if you aim for a recreated pattern rahter than an inspired one, you might leave the dress a bit looser and skip the lacing.

Useful notes:

Remember to add seam allowance to your new pieces, I like to add a bit extra (2-3 cm) in order to easier make adjustments during the fitting.

When you have achieved your new pattern in mock up fabric (or cut it out in your wool fabric) baste all the side pieces together to try out the fit. The many side gores will adjust the weight and fall of the fabric and there might be more stretching that needs to be adressed.

You also have a lot of seams now were you can make adjustments to make the dress fit perfectly to your body. If you need to take it in; don’t take in all the extra width in just one seam, instead spread it out between the seams.

Also; remember to wear your medieval supportive garment or modern bra of choice when fitting the dress so the dress will fit the bust nicely.

Sources:

Woven into the earth, Else Ostergaard, 2004

Medieval garments reconstructed, Ostergaard mm, 2011