HANDCRAFTED HISTORY


Leave a comment

How to put in a gore in a medieval garment

Remember my latest spring green wool dress? I took lots of photos during the process so I could show you how I made it, and share some great handsewing tip if you want to handsew a garment yourself. This post is a step-by-step on inserting gores in a garment, like front and back gores, small sleeve gores and gores for a hood.

The pattern? Here is a tutorial on how to make one.

Here’s an old post about a recreated Herjolfnes dress.

Lets start with my favourite way of inserting gores! With this method you will always get at gore that looks nice and ends in a smooth top.

Start with cutting up the back panel, make it around 1,5 cm shorter than the side of your gore.

Press the sides (the seam allowance) of the cut on the inside/wrong side of the dress.

Pin or baste the gore into place. If you are a bit new to handsewing, working on the inside might be easier, but you can also do this from the front/outside of the dress. The photo above shows the inside.

Start sewing from the outside, with a version of the whip stitch. Here you can se the bottom of the gore where I start; and the waxed linen thread going in from under the folded seam allowance to hide the knot. Vaxed linen thread (35/2) or a thin 2-ply wool thread are my favourite choices, but for an upper class garment silk is also an option.

To make the seam as invisible as possible, sew it like this; making my progress upwards on the inside of the fabric. The result is a seam that is only visible by small dots.

When I reach the point of the gore I just continue around, sewing small whip stitches all the way around the cut. The result is a set in gore that looks tidy, like this! But we are not finished yet, the seam needs to be finished of on the inside to be durable and neat.

This is what the inside of the garment looks like now.

Time to trim and fell the seam allowace! I start with cutting the seam allowance of the back panel down a bit, so the overlaying gore covers it. This looks tidy, and makes it easier to sew down.

When I have cut all around, I press the seam flat and whip stitch it into place. This will give me two seams holding the fabrics together, creating a very durable garment.

And the finished gore at the back of the dress. The small shadowed hollows around the gore is were the whip stitch from sewing down the seam allowance shows, these are nothing to be afraid of; it is a result of handsewing.


2 Comments

Making a sleeveless dress in easy steps

I decided to make another sleeveless middle dress to wear under my velvet houppelande. The other one (similar to this one, also in black silk tafetta) I made before apparently shrinked on its own in the wardrobe during the winter, and come spring was a little to small over the waist. Can’t imagine how this could happen..?

This style of dress may also be worn on it’s own with sleeves, in the Italian style. The amount and choice of fabric and decorations does all the difference in placing this dress on the fashion time line, as well as the waist seam is a clear indicator of region and time. I fancy the waist seam placement in the natural waist so I took inspiration from these paintings, as well as the Italian examples further down the post.

This kind of dress may also be made in wool or cotton, depending on the area you would like to get your inspiration from. Cotton was more common in Italy, while wool is much more common in Northen Europe. (For more information about cotton dresses, I recommend “The Italian cotton industry in the later middle ages 1100-1600” by Mazzaoui.)

I used a black silk tafetta, because I wanted a cool dress, matching the silk and velvet outfit and taking as little room as possible in my event packing. If you are going for a silk fabric, tafetta is more similar to historical fabrics than, for example, uneven dupioni or raw silk. Medieval dress silk should be shiny and evenly woven as far as I have seen.

I also have a similar one in amber wool twill, recreated to be worn by a woman not as high in social status as this black silk one will belong to. I took photos from both processes to be able to show you some different techniques.

Want to see how I made it?

1. This is a basic sketch of the pattern pieces. Really simple; a front and a back upper body + linings. Also 2 different ways to make the skirt; the black one are made of the rectangle, and gathered in the waist. The wool dress is made of panels (opt 2) to create more width in the bottom hem, but wide enough in the waist to gather.

2. Upper body pieces: I started with a front and back, loosely based on my toile/mock up pattern, and added 5 cm in each side to be able to adust the fit and have some extra fabric to fold to the inside for support. If you go for side lacing you can have a whole front piece, and the curve from the front seam will instead be moved to the sides. I will show you later!

3. Cut two of the outer fabric, and two lining pieces. Then baste them together to be able to work with the pieces without risking any movement.

You also need to decide if you are going to have lacing in both sides (seems to be usual in Italian portraits and handy if you often change your size) or in one side (faster to sew, allow you to get the dress on quickly).

4. Pin or baste the body pieces together and try them on. Having a friend to help you will be really helpful! Adjust and take in the side seams to create a smooth fit. You can also adjust the shoulders by gently pulling the front upwards if necessary. The fit doesn’t have to be all smooth, if you have lots of curves there will be some room in the dress (just decide on wearing a bra or not, or making the dress supportive before you finish).

Basting the skirt into place for the fitting is really good if you want to see how the fabric falls, and where the waist is going to be placed. Skirts usually “hang down” the bodice and make it look longer. Not the silk though- silk is such a light fabric.

5. Here is the body, inside out, after the fitting above. The line is really curved to make a god fit, and support the bust thanks to the stretch in the fabric and lining (lining is really important, don’t forget the lining!) If you are going to sew one side, use backstitching to create a durable seam.

Or if you are going to lace both sides, press the fabric to the wrong side of the body so you have 4 layers of fabric to sew the lacingholes through (if you work with a medium to thick wool this might not be necessary, you may instead trim some fabric down and whip stitck it into place. Remember that all the sewing allowance needs to be pressed down- don’t be tempted to leave “a little extra” as this might lead to the dress being a little bit too big…

6. The bodice during the sewing phase. I closed one side seam with backstitching, but left the sewing allowance. It is nice to have if you need to adjust the size or fit in the future. To keep it from fraying you can baste or whip it loosely to the lining of the bodice. The other side gets folded and pressed down.

7. The neck opening and arm openings I fold down (once for thicker fabric and twice for thin and fraying fabric) and whip stitch into place. To make it both pretty and durable, you can then press the openings and sew them one more time with a stab stitch.

Or you may finish the openings with a separate strip of fabric on the inside, as a reenforcement. Here I overlocked the lining and the outer silk fabric together after basting and fitting, and finished it of with sewing a fabric piece to the outside around the opening. That one I then folded and pressed down on the inside. This technique is good for sensitive, fraying fabrics and machine stitching.

Here you can also see the clamps; some silk fabrics get small marks by pins, and I therefore use clamps when working on visible places like the neckline. But they are very handy for all kinds of fabrics, so if you are not a fan of pins- try them out! (Search for sewing clamps or fabric clamps on an internet or sewing store of your choice)

8. The skirt part of the dress I usually sew separately from the bodice when I make garments with waist seams. Sewing the skirts together with running stitches, occacionally locked with a back stitch every needle lenght or so, will give you a fast and good seam. Press the seam allowance to one side, trim, and whip stitch it down. This is my favourite way of making long seams faster by hand. Or use a sewing machine, it is your choice!

9. After that, I hem the upper lining of the skirt, before gathering it (see the tiny stitches at the top of the skirt below?)

10. There are several different ways to gather or pleat a skirt to a bodice. I use different methods depending on the look I want. The wool skirt got gathered in soft pleats, and then sewn onto the bodice. I used a vaxed linen thread, to make the seam steady. Silk would have been another option, but as I wanted to create a working class garment I mainly used linen thread.

The black silk dress got a pleated skirt instead. The skirt part is simply made out of two rectangles that I have stitched together in the sides, leaving the seam at the top open for around 15 cm, to be able to get inside the skirt when it is attached to the bodice (if you have side lacings on each side, leave both side seams open a bit)

I use something to measure with, and then mark the pleats with a pen, or make them at once with pins or clamps. You could also calculate the amount and size of pleats if that is to your taste, but I usually just roll with it. There might be an extra pleat or some uneveness- but it won’t be visible.

In the front the folds are sewn towards the side of the body, while in the back the folds meet in the back. By arranging them this way you create a flatter front, with more volume at the hips and back. After the entire waist is gathered/pleated, I often secure the folds with a basting stitch, or pins before I sew it to the bodice. (See the photo of the wool dress above, I use this method for most waist seams.)

11. Lacing: if you are a bit unsure, you could save the lacing holes to last and do them after one last fitting with the dress on, with the right shift/chemise under. Otherwise I like to sew them before attaching the skirt, I feel it is easier to sew with less fabric on my knees. I use a spiral lacing and finish it of at the waist seam. Often my skirt will stay closed enough without any further closure, but if I have a more narrow skirt that fits snugly over my sides I might need to add a fastening like a hook and eye, to keep it closed.

Spiral lacing on another project, just to show you what it looks like. If you need lots of support from you dress, make the lacing holes tighter together. If you have a looser dress style, you don’t need as many. I usually have 2-3 cm between each hole on one of the sides.

12. Last; finish of the bottom hem. Check to see if it is even and adjust if necessary (a friend is a good help here but modeling yourself and adding pins might work) I usually just finish the hem with a single or double fold and a whip stitch. After that, just try on your new dress!

If you want to add loose sleeves, here is my tutorial on the black ones with ribbon. 

 

 


4 Comments

Thoughts on making medieval garments

I wanted to share some thoughts with you today; things I have learned and things I find important, when I design medieval clothing. Both for myself and for customers. Being new in any branch of historical reenacting or costuming can be overwhelming, and just like with all other things in life there’s no simple answers or an ultimate guide. “Just read this book, and then you will know everything”… I haven’t found it at least.

But don’t feel overwhelmed! It is such an interesting journey you have ahead, exploring and experiencing other times and new handcrafting. And there’s lots of others that love to share their knowledge in this field as well. Here’s some great things I have learned over the years, that I like to share whenever I can!

Choosing materials is clearly one of the more difficult things when starting with historical handcrafting, and often the simplest way to succeed in making a good outfit is to pay the price for good material, and buy the same as everyone else. Seems boring at frist, right? But instead of wanting to make that perfect deal on super cheap wool in a really unique colour; think about what historical look you want to achieve with your outfit, and what qualities you would like the garment to have.

The places that sells fabrics especially to reenactors often produce high quality fabrics, and their customers will come back to buy more if they like it. The chance will also be that they are knowledgeable in historical fabrics so you can find materials, colours and qualities that resembles the historical originals, whilst giving you a fabric that will last for a long time to an affordable price.

The quality of the fabric will differ with manufacturers, places of origin, type of material etc so make sure to read up a bit on what material would be good for your individual project. Look at what others say about the seller and the different fabrics they offer, and learn some useful words: tabby and twill are weaving techniques, and twill is often more stretchy. Felted means the fabric has been fulled and is often less stretchy, but more weather resistant and smooth. Thin, medium and heavy are different weights in wool fabrics, whereas 120 grams etc are the weight of a m2 fabric.

Fabric shopping at The historical fabric store

It is always best to be able to see and feel the fabric yourself, and now when we stay at home, fabric samples are a good choice. If you have friends, a group or other people around you that are good at different fabrics, ask them for advise (or use a forum online) and always state what kind of garment you would like to make (a kirtle) for what period (14th century) and for what kind of use (reenactment event during winter etc). That way you may save both money and effort instead of buying the first fabric you find, and then get disappointed.

Preparation of fabric

Wool and Linen

I always prewash fabrics before sewing, even for my customers. I know that many in the field claim that you can’t wash wool fabrics in water, but that’s just bullsh*t. Of course you can wash fabrics, at least good ones. Bad ones? Might shrink uneven, get to much wear or completely change the look, feel and even the colour in contact with water. But you know what? That is not ok for garment fabrics. They should be made to endure everyday wear and wet weather, washing, food stains and so on. Those things totally existed in the medieval ages, it would be strange if your medieval outfit couldn’t endure the same right?

Furthermore, prewashing fabrics will release the weaving tension in the warp, making it shrink slightly and give you the fall it will have after ironing/washing/a rainstorm. You could get the same result by steaming the fabric with an iron before sewing, but that won’t remove the…

Chemicals and anti-mold treatments. Fabric today needs to last for longer times during shipping and warehousing, and look good when arriving on the shelf in the fabric store. To achieve this most fabrics (and ready made garments) are treated with different kind of chemicals, which will wash out in the washing process. Or rub of on your body… Not a good thought, right? Always prewash your fabrics!

Linen: soak in water a while before washing, to get a smoother fabric. Not necessary, but worth it. Fold it loosely in the bathtub for example. Wash the wet fabric in 40- 60 degrees C (the temperature you would like to wash your linen shift/shirt in later) hang to dry and then iron on a high temperature.

Wool: wash by hand or use the wool setting in the washing machine. Use cold to luke warm water and wool detergent. If you don’t have that, use a little shampoo, because wool is hair, and will not look its best after strong detergents. Also, hot water might felt it and make it look dull.

Silk and silk velvets are the only fabrics I don’t wash before use, but rather iron very gently and hang out to air before use.

This dress has been washed several times in water, and still looks like new.

Which thread?

Thats depends on what fabric you want to use, and what you want to make. But I prefer natural materials and “same for same”: silk for silk fabric, linen threads for linen, and wool for wool fabrics. Oh, or silk and linen for wool fabrics too, because that is a historical choice and very easy to work with. If you prefer to use a sewing machine, cotton thread for linen and silk for wool garments work nice. Polyester thread is a bit to “sharp” and might lead to breakage in the fabric rather than the seam if you happen to get stuck in something with your garment. But yeah, it will work on a sewing machine if that is what you have, I just don’t recommend it.

Where to start?

It is always good to start with underwear like shirt, shift and breeches. They will make up the base, are often easier to make and linen is not as expensive as wool. Also, you’ll get to try out the fit, the seams and some techniques.

After that, it is more a question of what you need versus what you are inspired to start with. Remember, handcrafting should be fun and not only practical! I like to make a middle/base layer next, often in wool, to be worn on warm events or when I work. After this is done, I adjust and finish of necklines at under-garments so they are not visible (if that is not fashionable) and start with some accessories, and another layer for warmth and weather protection. The medieval period (and others too) often have an outfit made up of several layers, and that is really practical when going to outdoor events!

Wearing a thin wool gown on a summer event. Photo taken by Catrine Lilja Kanon

Other good tips is to make a mock up or toile, basically a try out on the garment you desire, made in a cheap/recycled cotton fabric. It might seem as you are doing the work twice, but this is really handy as you get to try out the pattern, fit and look on the garment without risking that really expensive fabric. And if the mock up gets really good, you just pick apart the basted seams and use it as a pattern!

Basting is also a good investment; long running stitches will hold together your fabric pieces enough for a final fit before sewing, and will make it both faster and easier to sew all the seams by hand. I will confess, when I started sewing medieval clothing I NEVER basted anything and rarely pinned the seams, but after several surprises (Whot, how come I got this fit?) I learned it was both better and faster to check the fit, before sewing the final seams…

How to decide on social class and status?

Ohh, don’t ask me, I always change between working class garments and fancy party outfits depending on the event, place and what I feel like… But generally, just go for whatever catches your fancy! Or pick clothing after your preferred activities; are you going to stroll around a market fair with friends? Visit a fancy banquet? Or do you prefer mud wrestling, archery, beer taverns or outdoor cooking? Not only will you look much better with the right kind of clothing, you will also find that your activities will be much more fun with the right garments! A short dress and practical hood for the forest archery, or a thin and cool kirtle with hose for the indoor festivities.

A well of working class doublet, perfect for active events…

And a silk brocade doublet for those fancy strolls in the garden

Garments you need

This is always a tricky question, as it depends on the weather, the type of event and the gender and social status you want to portray. I thought I did great at my first events wearing a linen tunic, shoes and a cloak, I neither froze to much or died, but nowadays I confess of having higher standards… Like, I want to both look like I fit in the historical context, being comfy, not getting to much mosquito bites, and not freeze during chilly evenings. I also like to change my linen underwear everyday to feel fresh, as well as having some change of outer wear/dresses just because I feel like it. Oh, now I’m babbling again. You would never guess hom much text I always have to delete because of babbling…

Getting dressed in the morning; linen shift, wool hose and leather turnshoes

1. You generally need linen underwear, and a change for longer events. Several changes, if you’re not going to wash the clothes during the event. We want to look medieval, not smell medieval…

2. A thin or medium warm wool layer for summer events, for working or for indoor events.

3. An outer layer for cold evenings, if you get wet or want to look well dressed. I recommend another layer of kirtle/dress/coat rather than a cloak to get more use out of your clothing.

4. Headwear like hats, veils, hoods etc. Both to complete the outfit estetically, but also because it gives you cover from weather and bugs.

5. Shoes! Don’t forget shoes, make or buy a pair that is looking good and feels comfortable. Hose (long or short) with thin leather soles is also workable on warm events, paired with pattens.

6. Accessories, both fancy and practical: belt, garters, bags, purses, cloaks, headwear, gloves… You name it. These can really set the style and time period, so check out sources before you decide on what to add to complete your outfit!

A 15th c outfit in 3 layers; shift, middle kirtle and overdress complete with shoes, headwear and accessories.

Wear it!

Historical clothing should be worn, because it is awesome and comfy and look great… You know that you’re allowed to wear it around the house right? Or take the great cloak for that chilly walk, or use the apron when doing gardening work. You shouldn’t need to be super careful with your garments, they will look even better when you have worn them a couple of times. My favourite shift is 6 years old and worn transparent thin over my shoulders and back after months of wearing, but I love it.

And make it last longer:

If you have long skirts, fold them up or pull them up into your belt when walking so you don’t step on the hem, or drag it through mud. That will make the fabric last longer. Protect the handsewn leather turnshoes with pattens when walking through rain or mud, and always mend holes and rips as soon as you find them on your garments. At the end of season, I always wash, mend, air and look through all my garments before putting them into the wardrobe. For this year though, I recommend taking them out for airing a time or two to avoid dust and bugs.

Getting dressed in historical clothing is actually a bit different than getting dressed in your favourite comfy pants and tshirt. If you are used to wearing stretchy clothing, you will need to be a bit more careful getting dressed and undressed with the woven natural fibres. Imagine it more like a suit, pull it carefully over your head, always open lacing and buttons before removing the garment, and never “jump” into your medieval joined hose. Another tip to make your hose last longer is to always pull them up before kneeling or sitting, and to wear garters under the knee to make them stay in place.

Early 14th c outfit with accessories

Yeah, I think I got the most parts down here, and it became quite the long blog post. Maybe I am tired of sitting at home, talking to the cats and love all the time? Who am I kidding? I am REALLY tired of sitting at home, I miss events, adventures and being able to go out and do fun stuff. But most of all, I miss you friends, readers and fellow history-travelers! Stay safe and take care so we can meet each other soon!

Love, L


Leave a comment

Åka på lajv del 3: Lajvdräkten

I de två tidigare delarna har jag talat om spelteknik och gett er mina bästa packtips, nu tänkte jag prata lite om det jag tycker är roligast innan lajv; dräktskapandet. Förutom att jag tycker om att sy och skapa med händerna, ger lajvdräkter ofta möjlighet till att vara kreativ och att lägga till delar i dräkten som ska vara kommunikativa.

This blogpost is in Swedish like the ones before, but might be of interest to the international larping scene too. To translate, you will have to copypaste this into google translate. Feel free to do so if you would like to read it! (Sorry, as Swedish is my native language these posts were much faster to make in Swedish. Which gives me more time for the tutorials to get translated, I guess?)

Foto från Eterna; Trons makt, 2013 på shaolerna. Att vara lika skapar ofta samhörighet och kommunicerar grupptillhörighet.

Men vi börjar från början.

På de allra flesta lajv behöver du en lajvdräkt, som ska följa lajvvärldens dräktkrav för den roll du skulle vilja spela. Att komma utan dräkt är inget alternativ, så du kommer behöva låna/hyra/sy/leta/göra en dräkt som passar åtminstone till lajvets lägsta krav (oftast enkla raka plagg i bomull, linne och ull) men helst vill man ha en dräkt som också passar till rollens folkslag, kön, status, personlighet och uppgift.

Var kan man hitta dräkter till medeltid/vikingatid/fantasylajv?

Sy själv, köp begagnat på köp/säljsidor på internet (ex fb) låna/hyr av andra lajvare (föreningar och arrangörsgrupper erbjuder ibland alternativ), leta delar på secondhand (ex enkla vita skjortor, strumpor, yllebyxor, filtar), köp på internet från sidor som säljer färdigproducerat, eller beställ av personer (som mig) som syr på beställning åt andra.

Olika folkslag; olika dräkter gör det enkelt för lajvare att spela mot varandra utan att behöver lära sig vad alla spelar utantill.

Vad behöver man?

Det skiljer så mycket mellan olika lajv/kampanjer/tider på året så det går inte att säga något generellt. Men tänk gärna lager; linne underst, sedan ett eller flera lager ull beroende på väder. Skor som passar, samt accessoarer, regnskydd och tillbehör. Testa den tänkta dräkten utomhus, flera veckor innan lajvet.

Vad kostar det?

Du kan hitta en komplett lajvdräkt begagnat för 300 spänn. Eller beställa en helt ny med extra lyx-allt för 10 000 kr. Det är svårt att ge ett bestämt svar, så bestäm dig hellre för en budget och jobba utifrån den, eller börja att samla på dig tyg/delar under vintern för att ha bra kläder klara till sommaren. Jag har sällan kommit under 1000 kr för en dräkt (jag gjort själv, samt köpt in begagnade delar till).

Var hittar jag material och rekvisita?

På internet; idag finns det massor av bra tyg och rekvisitasidor på internet som säljer enbart till lajvare och liknande intressen. När jag började köpte vi tyg på loppis, gjorde egna vapen genom att slakta gamla liggunderlag och löste många problem med tejp. Idag kan du som lajvare välja dräkt, svärd och tillbehör efter genre; alv, steampunk, 1500tal, möjligheterna är oändliga! Men var lite misstänksam, en tysk sida som säljer lajvvapen superbilligt kanske inte har nog höga säkerhetskrav för att tillåtas på svenska lajv. Och alvmanteln på w*sh är förmodligen sydd i billig syntet, smälter om den utsätts för gnistor och håller inte värmen. Ställ frågor, prata på forum, kolla med lajvet du vill åka på innan du köper. Längst ner på Tutorials här på bloggen hittar du shoppingguider.

Var hittar jag hantverksbeskrivningar och inspiration?

Åter igen på internet! Pinterest, Youtube, bloggar, filmer, serier… ofta har lajvet en egen hemsida med information och egen inspiration. Börja därifrån och leta vidare. Det finns till exempel massvis med filmer som beskriver hur du sminkar dina alvöron bra. På den här bloggen hittar du massor med gratis sömnadsbeskrivningar för att sy egna plagg.

Foto från Eterna; Trons makt 2013, en av de dräkter jag skapat som jag känt mig mest nöjd med. Att lyckas med att kombinera praktisk, och tydligt kommunikativ är inte alltid enkelt, men ger en bra effekt på lajv.

Det var grundnivån; nu tänkte jag prata om hur du får din lajvdräkt att gå från “godkänd” till “fantastisk”. Fundera igenom punkterna här under; och anteckna dina ideér:

(Som exempel tänkte jag använda rollen från mitt senaste lajv, en mörkeralv som tillhörde en historisk japansk/koreanskt inspirerad kultur. Hon föddes in i rikedom och ett bekvämt leverne, och är politiskt bildad. Det blev ingen fantastisk dräkt kanske, men den uppfyller alla punkterna!)

Rollen Arquen Araki Meiyuri, elgarinsk mörkeralvsadel.

Lajvvärlden/kampanjens förutsättningar: vad anger lajvet att du behöver för att spela en viss roll? (Exempel: Elgarin är japansk/koreansk influerade. Dräkten ska vara svart och blå/svart och lila. Håret svart/mörkt, hyn bleksminkad, öronen spetsiga.)

Rollens bakgrund och personlighet: vad har rollen gjort tidigare i sitt liv, var kommer den ifrån? Vildmarken eller storstaden? Är den praktiskt lagd, eller rik? Äger den viktiga personliga saker såsom smycken, förfädernas svärd, en helig sten? (Exempel: vida ärmar som gör praktiskt arbete obekvämt, komplicerad frisyr som passar hov och stadsliv, dyra smycken.)

Genus/kön: ibland anger lajvet att olika dräkter gäller för olika kön/genus, ibland kopplar de enbart dräkt till funktion. Är du mest bekväm i byxor eller kjol? Eller vad passar din roll bäst? (Exempel: vi valde genusneutral klädsel och hade alla tunika, byxor och lång kimono i gruppen. Dels för att skapa enighet, dels för att markera att genus inte var intressant för oss att spela på.)

Ibland är det mer intressant att vara lika, än att vara olika

Estetik: titta på massor av bilder/inspiration innan du börjar skapa din dräkt. Vilken stil? Vilket formspråk? Vilka plagg används? Vilka färger/toner/nyanser? (Exempel: jag samlade bilder från kulturerna vi skulle inspireras av, och valde en japansk frisyr, kimonos inspirerade av historiska plagg, raka siluetter, höga midjor och detaljer som är asiatiskt influerade.)

Praktiskt: materialval är viktigt. Linne andas och är svalt, ylle värmer. Välj bekväma skor i skinn som du kan gå i en hel helg. (Exempel: underst hade flera av oss underställ, sedan byxor i ull eller linne och en tunika. Kimonon syddes i ett varmt ylletyg eftersom lajvet var på hösten.)

Färg: har oftast symboliska betydelser i lajvvärlden, men kan också användas som allmän färgkodning. Svart/rött/lila används ofta för att signalera ondska eller magi, djupa färger (mörkblå, lila, vinrött) för att signalera rikedom, skogsfärger (grönt,grått,brunt) för att signalera naturfolk eller skogsvana roller. (Exempel: färgerna var redan valda på förhand i lajvvärlden, men de svarta dräkterna hjälpte oss med att framstå som lite onda, snobbiga och osympatiska)

svart är en enkel färg att använda om du vill spela ond eller osympatisk

Symboler och symboliska tillbehör: med symboler menar jag både sådant som används i lajvkampanjen ifråga. Till exempel religiösa symboler, men också saker som används för att beskriva grupptillhörighet såsom spetsiga öron på alver, synligt smink på adel. Symboliska tillbehör förstärker delar av din roll. Den praktiska livvakten kanske har ett kortare svärd, den mäktiga krigaren ett långt svärd och rustning, lönnmördaren dolda knivar i dräkten. Egentligen är det samma typ av föremål (ett vasst vapen till för att dräpa andra) men du skulle inte gärna kunna byta plats på föremålen utan att de förlorar sin trovärdighet. (Exempel: solfjädern påminner både om kulturell inspiration men ger också rollen en känsla av rik, bortskämd och någon som inte arbetar.)

Patinering: ska din roll vara ren, eller smutsig? Att medvetet fläcka ner, förstöra och laga din dräkt ger en känsla av trovärdighet. Jag har skrivit mer om patinering och hur du gör i tidigare inlägg på bloggen, till exempel de här: (Exempel: håret borstades varje dag för att förstärka en ordnad känsla.)

Gör lajvdräkten trovärdig- om patinering

Patinera ditt plagg- steg för steg

 

Val av plagg: praktiska plagg signalerar en rörlig roll, kanske spejare, arbetare, bonde, krigare. Långa kåpor, mantlar, rockar kan betyda rikedom, hög status eller helighet/magiska utövare. Mängd tyg symboliserar ofta rikedom, såsom vida ärmar, breda byxor. Hattar och huvudbonader är tacksamma för att förstärka en dräkt; en magiker, religiös ledare, kung/drottning, en rik handelsman… Titta gärna på vad som används i dagens kultur/film/serier/konst och lajvifiera/skapa fritt efter dessa. Det ökar möjligheten att andra lajvare förstår vad du vill kommunicera med din roll. (Exempel: långa kimonos med långa ärmar signalerar status, bekvämlighet, rikedom). Men de påverkar också kroppshållningen och rörelserna till att bli långsammare, mer noggranna och innebär att varje arbetsuppgift inleds med att ärmen flyttas undan, och sedan rättas till igen.

rättar till kragen

Sist av allt; ingen föds till en expert på att göra lajvdräkter! Till mitt första lajv sydde jag en underklänning av ett lakan (förlåt mamma!) och en grön linneklänning med vida ärmar… till rollen som piga. Tillsammans med en brun mantel och stallskorna utgjorde det här mer eller mindre hela min dräkt, och jag både överlevde och fick mersmak. Vad jag ville säga? Våga börja sy!


Leave a comment

Åka på lajv del 2: Praktiska tips och packning

Förra gången skrev jag om spelteknik och nu tänkte jag bli mer praktisk genom att skriva om själva packningen, och allt du behöver ha med dig. 360 graderslajvande (den vanligaste typen av lajvande i Sverige?) innebär att du både omger dig med saker, spelar i en miljö och bär kläder som passar till lajvvärlden, vilket gör lajv till något av en prylsport. Men det är också det som gör lajvandet så speciellt; en omedelbar förflyttning till en helt annan värld.

This post is in Swedish since I am addressing the Swedish larping scene, which differs from other countries.

Jag har publicerat inlägg tidigare på bloggen som handlar om packlistor och packning, och de kan du återfinna här:

Förvaring på lajv och medeltidsevent; påsar, säckar och en hemmagjord ryggsäck

Min första lajvpackning, eller hur du undviker att frysa när du sover

Du kan också skriva in “lajv” i sökrutan för alla inlägg på svenska som handlar om lajv, eller klicka i kategorin “larping/lajv” för mer lajvrelaterat.

Det första du behöver veta, är förstås vad du ska använda din packning till. Var ska du? Hur länge ska du vara borta? Och vilka regler gäller på det lajv du ska åka till? Att skapa en helt generell lista är väldigt svårt, eftersom mycket av packningen varierar med roll (exempelvis dräkt, vapen, tillbehör) boende (tält, inomhus, kallt, varmt) och hur du ska lajva (svår terräng med mygg eller i en herrgård med serverad mat).

Foto från lajvet Nordanil där jag arbetade i köket; här fanns all köksutrustning redan på plats!

Du kan dela upp din packning i två delar: det du behöver för att sköta om dig själv och orka lajva, och det du behöver för att kunna delta i lajvet och göra en bra rollprestation.

Exempel del 1:
vatten + mugg
mat + tillagningskärl + matskål
filtar + varma strumpor + tält

Exempel del 2:
rollens dräkt
vapen eller annan rekvisita

Var inte rädd för att fråga andra lajvare, arrangörer och internet efter fler tips. Jag spenderade mina första 10+ lajv med att frysa under nätterna och sova dåligt innan jag lärde mig att hålla värmen utomhus under yllefilten, och hur jag skulle packa för att åstadkomma det. Lösningen? Att äta och dricka mer än jag brukar, samt att sova med underställ, mössa, strumpor, och täcke under filten.

Foto på Becky som spelade handlare; här behövdes mycket kläder att sälja (inlajv eller på riktigt)

Här kommer packlistorna som jag brukar använda mig av:

Sovplatsen:
lager 1: liggunderlag/fältsäng/uppblåsbar madrass
lager 2: får eller renskinn
lager 3: sovpåse i form av en hopsydd, stor yllefilt med ett duntäcke/sovsäck i + kudde

lager 4: extra filt om det är kallare

Närmast kroppen: underställ, mössa, tjocka strumpor. Om du vill se inlajv ut; det går bra att sova i lajvkläder, väl mjuka yllekläder. Tänk på att du behöver ett ombyte ifall du blir blöt under dagen.

Bra tips: myggnät att hänga upp för att slippa mygg, har du inget nät fungerar ett tunt bomullstyg bra att hänga över ansiktet. Öronproppar för att sova ostört. En hätta är bra för värme+myggskydd.

Tänk på: marken kyler, hoppa inte över skinnen som skyddar dig mot markkylan. Ullfiltarna skyddar mot kvällsfukten som kyler ner din sovplats, men också mot eld. Ersätt inte yttersta lagret ull med syntetfibrer, om ett ljus eller gnistor skulle falla över din sovplats.

Moderna saker:

Necessär med tandborste, hudkräm, ev mediciner och annat som används till vardags (man mår bra av att få borsta tänderna och ta hand om sig själv)
Skavsårsplåster, sårtvätt, handsprit, våtservetter, toapapper.

Mobil, kamera i en plastpåse.

Mat:

Välj den mat som du vet att du gillar, och packa lite mer än du äter hemma. Nu ska energin räcka till massor av äventyr och att hålla dig varm. Det är helt ok att förbereda matlådor att värma på plats, gör det bara diskret om det räknas som modern mat som lasagne.
Frukostmat som jag gillar + kaffe + kanna att koka upp vatten i på elden.
Lunch och middag i form av enkla rätter, piroger, paj som kan ätas kall, en snabb soppa eller dyl.

Vatten, minst 6 liter/dygn (om inte det finns på området). Tänk på att du behöver både dricksvatten, tvätt och diskvatten.

Snacks ifall du blir trött och hungrig; frukt, kex, torkad frukt, godis…

Kärl att laga mat i, slev, skärbräda… Allt du behöver för att laga mat, samt matsaker för att äta. Testa gärna hemma först om du aldrig provat att laga mat över öppen eld. Kolla med arrangemanget om det finns eldstäder, ved osv eller om du behöver ordna det själv.

Tips: både filtar, skinn, grytor och träskålar kan man hitta på loppisar billigt om man är beredd att leta. Börja flera månader innan du tänkt åka på lajv för att hinna förbereda din packning utan att den blir alltför dyr.

Tips: mat håller en hel helg med hjälp av kyla. Kylbag gömd i en säck, kylklampar, frusna matlådor, frusna vattenflaskor är bra alternativ.

Matlagning under ett SCAevent (medeltida läger) med massor av bra lägerutrustning synligt.

Packning:

Prova gärna packa några dagar innan lajvet för att se om du kan bära allting, kontrollera att du inte glömt skaffa något samt fundera på hur allt kan packas så bra som möjligt. Ska du bära långt kan en fjällryggsäck vara bra, men om du skaffar lajviga säckar och väskor så slipper du gömma saker på lajvet.

Boende:

Fråga arrangörerna om boende ingår eller går att köpa till/hyra, om du inte har ett eget inlajvigt tält eller kan dela med andra i en grupp. Tänk på att historiska tält är både dyra, tunga att bära och kräver skötsel, så blir du inbjuden att bo i någon annans tält så erbjud dem en slant som tack, hjälp till med att bära och ta med kakor att bjuda på. Då kanske du blir inbjuden igen… En del sover offlajv (utanför lajvets område) av olika skäl (har inget bra tält, vill åka hem och sova, sjukdomar osv) men då missar man en del av lajvet.

Transport:

De flesta lajv äger rum ute i skogen, så du behöver ta bilen dit. Vissa arrangemang erbjuder upphämtning av deltagare på stationer/busshållplatser. Ett annat alternativ är att samåka med andra. Planera hur du ska ta dig till och från lajvet flera veckor innan start; om du behöver matsäck samt boka hämtning eller samåkning med andra. Om någon erbjuder dig plats i bil; skicka en bild/beskrivning på hur mycket packning du har och fråga om den får plats- gör den inte det behöver du fundera på andra alternativ. Erbjud dig också att betala mer än bara din del i bensinen, föraren står ju faktiskt för hela bilen, kör den och hämtar/lämnar dig också på en plats.

Gruppen bestämde sig för gula västar för att visa att vi hörde ihop, längst ned till vänster i bild är vår nyanställde vakt som ännu inte fått en väst…

innan han förrådde oss!

Kläder:

En dräkt som passar till den roll du ska spela… men som också passar till tiden på året och vilken temperatur det kan vara. Som ett exempel har jag under flera år åkt på lajv i juli utanför Skellefteå, och där har temperaturer uppmätts på mellan +5 till +30 grader. Du behöver flera lager, och gärna ett ombyte om du blir blöt. Jag brukar försöka ha med mig två skjortor/tunikor i linne och sedan lager på lager med ullkläder. Som nybörjare känns det dyrt att köpa ulltyger till dräkten, men det kommer göra din lajvupplevelse bättre och är kläderna välsydda så kan du alltid sälja dem efter lajvet, för att köpa in tyg till nya dräkter…

Där har du min dräktkarriär i en mening, att sälja gamla kläder har gjort att jag har kunnat bekosta nya projekt och utvecklats. Om du inte vill sy själv, så säljer många lajvare begagnade kläder för billiga summor. Ett alternativ som är vanligt i andra länder är att du beställer dräkt av någon som syr upp lajv/historiska kläder på beställning. Du kan få exakt den dräkt du vill ha, i dina mått och med ett bra andrahandsvärde om du sedan vill sälja och köpa nytt.

Min första dräkt till kampanjerollen Sari, fotat 2006. Det är med skräckblandad skäms-känsla jag tittar på de här bilderna nu.

Hur tänkte jag överleva i skogen i 3 dagar iförd höftskynke, linnetunika och väst? Jag hade tur den gången, det varm varmt och soligt nästan hela lajvet.

Tips: kom ihåg underkläder och flera par strumpor.

Bra att veta: många lajv har krav på vilken typ av dräkt/färg/stil du ska välja till olika roller. Tänk på det när du väljer roll så du är säker på att du kan göra/få tag på rätt dräkt till lajvet. Många lajv hjälper nybörjare med att hitta/låna/sy/hyra dräkt till sitt första lajv- fråga arrangörerna.

Idag finns mycket gratis sömnadsbeskrivningar, filmer på Youtube och inspiration att hitta på Pinterest. Hur skulle din ultimata dräkt se ut till en viss roll?

Tänk på: att hitta/skapa en bra dräkt tar mycket tid och kostar pengar, men kommer också ge dig en bättre upplevelse och skapa rätt stämning för andra. Med hjälp av dräkten kan du visa andra spelare om din roll är rik, mäktig, ond, magisk, tillhör en viss grupp…

Mer om att skapa lajvdräkter finns här på bloggen, sök på “lajv” eller “lajvdräkt” i bloggens sökfält.

Samma roll, fast 2013 (längst ut till höger) byxor i ull och skinn, kjortel och handskar i skinn, kappa i ull och päls. Lite äldre, mycket klokare. 

Rekvisita och tillbehör:

Eftersom lajv är en aktivitet som man gör för sin egen skull men också med respekt för andra, så är rekvisita en viktig del av din och andras upplevelser. Många arrangörer lägger massor av resurser på att skapa bra miljöer, coola monster, fina skatter… du behöver inte vara sämre!
Olika typer av rekvisita:

  1. Skapa din roll och kommunicera vad du spelar till andra. Exempel: magikerstav, svärd och sköld, nycklar, heliga påsar, slevar och grytor- välj det som din roll borde äga!
  2. Rekvisita som inbjuder till spel. Exempel: en helig amulett (som kan stjälas), hemliga brev (som kan smygläsas) en förbjuden dolk (som kan hittas) är saker som du kan ta med eller plantera ut på lajvet. Hittar du/tar du andras rekvisita under lajvet förväntas du alltid ge tillbaka det direkt efter lajvet. Annars är det ju faktiskt stöld enligt svensk lag.
  3. Rekvisita som skapar miljö/stämning: Exempel: ljusstakar, dukar, möbler, flaggor, prydnadssaker, smycken, tavlor… Allt som inte behövs eller ska spelas med, men som förstärker upplevelsen för dig själv och andra.

Mysbelysning skapar stämning

Till dina första lajv kommer du förmodligen inte dra med dig så mycket saker; de flesta är rätt överväldigade när de börjar lajva och nöjda om de kommit ihåg Både mat, sovplats och kläder. Mången är den lajvare som drömt mardrömmar inför ett lajv om att anlända utan svärdet eller dräkten (och en del har gjort just detta).

Men gå gärna runt innan och efter ett lajv, hälsa på olika grupper och kolla hur de bor och vad de valt att ta med sig för att förstärka stämningen och sin grupp. Fota eller skriv inspirationslistor till framtida lajv, eller inspireras av miljöer i filmer.

Innan lajv är det fantastiskt att komma så tidigt som möjligt. Då hinner du se dig omkring på området, träffa medspelare och kanske komma överens om roligt spel med andra. Efter lajvet stannar de flesta kvar några timmar för att mingla och fota, ta tillfället i akt att lära känna folk på riktigt. Fråga gärna om tips på dräkt, spel och gå fram till de som tillfört spel till ditt lajv och tacka. Beröm någons coola kläder, och hjälp sedan till att packa (först dina egna saker, sedan din grupps saker) och städa (din egen lägerplats, sedan hjälper man arrangörerna).

Vapen till salu, en fana, färgglada drycker i små flaskor. Ingenting är nödvändigt för att åka på lajvet, men allt bidrar till känslan!

Extra tips: gillar du inte att skriva listor? Fota istället dina grejer, utlagda på golvet, för att komma ihåg vad du har och hur du brukar packa det!


Leave a comment

Åka på lajv del 1: Lajv och spelteknik

Det här är en post som handlar om lajv, olika sätt att lajva på och hur du bygger ett roligt och dynamiskt spel på ett lajv som gör att alla har roligt. Jag skriver främst utifrån min erfarenhet av historiskt inspirerade och fantasylajv. Den här texten förutsätter att du vet vad lajv är/har varit på lajv förut så om du inte har en aning- följ länken nedan och läs den först!

Foto från lajvet I Stormens Öga från 2020.

This post is in Swedish since it addresses the Swedish larping community, and larps are very different in other countries.

Vad är lajv? Läs mer om det HÄR om du är intresserad.

Hur fungerar då egentligen ett lajv?

Du skriver eller tilldelas själv en roll/karaktär som du sedan spelar hela tiden, utan brytningar, pauser eller omtagningar. Du ska agera och basera dina val på vad din roll skulle göra, umgås med de som din roll känner, och försöka uppnå de mål som står i din intrig/karaktär/i din grupps intrig. Det här gör du, tillsammans med andra personer som gör exakt samma sak; har skrivit sin egen roll och agerar utifrån den. Arrangörer står för att samordna lajvet, planera en ramberättelse och en värld, samt skapa intriger som fungerar som ett sätt att starta/skapa spännande spel.

Det finns förstås otroligt många sätt att göra det här på, och lajv är något man lär sig medan man upplever det. Det är faktiskt en av få aktiviteter där du som nybörjare kan kasta dig in och delta fullt ut utan att känna att du är sämre än andra, eller behöver lära dig lajvandet innan du kan vara med på riktigt. Däremot kommer du få roligare, och kunna bidra med roligare spel när du lär dig mer om hur lajv fungerar, vad som kan hända, och vilka möjligheter till spel som finns.

Foto från Eterna; Sagors Slut från 2014

Därför tänkte jag berätta om några olika sätt att spela under ett lajv, några termer som är bra att känna till och lite om hur olika spelare tänker under lajv. Det här är inte ett inlägg som går igenom allt som finns att tänka på; se det mer som en bra start!

360 graders spel: Allt man omger sig med, skapar och spelar ska vara så genuint i lajvvärlden som möjligt. Man undviker moderna saker, platser och stunder där man bryter spelet osv. Den vanligaste formen av lajv.

Blackbox spel: Omgivning, dräkt och saker är oviktiga, bara själva spelet räknas. Genomförs ofta under kortare perioder som test av roller, som workshops, eller som hela lajv.

Spela reaktivt: Du inväntar händelser eller motspelare som du sedan reagerar på utifrån hur din roll skulle reagera. Om inget speciellt händer din roll, inväntar du spel eller byter plats för att se om det händer mer spel på andra delar av lajvet. Exempel: “Åh, någon blev nedskjuten, sjukt spännande! Jag springer och hämtar en helare!”

Spela aktivt: Du skapar händelser och söker upp andra spelare som du sedan lajvar med. Oftast kanske du behöver vara något mer aktiv än din roll skulle varit “på riktigt” för att det här ska fungera. Exempel: “Åh, jag blev nedskjuten! Jag gick i skogen ensam med en påse guld (och kunde nog lista ut att det var en dålig idé, men kul var det).

Spela katalysatoriskt: Du planerar/skapar/bygger händelser och spel mot andra för att skapa fler spelmöjligheter och upplevelser för andra, även om det egentligen inte är troligt att din roll skulle göra så. Exempel: “Hah! Min plan att lura ut en person i skogen, anställa andra för att råna denne och sedan plantera bevisen hos en tredje part lyckades. Det hade varit enklast att gå och hämta guldet själv, och det krävdes en del offlajvplanering, men det var det värt”.

Foto från Nordanil 3, SLP-roller som bara spelades någon timme.

Spela SLP/arrangörsroller: Du tilldelas roller eller funktioner som arrangörerna tycker behövs för att driva spelet framåt, och spelar sedan dessa för bästa möjliga spelupplevelse för andra. Exempel: på morgonen är du budbärare som kommer med ett viktigt brev, sedan byter du om till kung några timmar för att hålla en rättegång, för att på kvällen istället vara ett monster som skrämmer andra i skogen.

Funktionärsroller: Roller som behövs för att driva praktiska saker under lajvet, till exempel kökspersonal, någon som tänder lyktor, håller kontakt mellan grupper eller mot arrangörer. Skrivs ofta som roller i form av värdshuspersonal, pigor, brevsändare osv.

Spela inåt: Du prioriterar den inre upplevelsen av att vara en roll, agera och tänka utifrån rollen, spela diskret eller uppleva saker som din roll under ett lajv. Exempel: den mystiske vandraren som då och då skymtas ute i skogen, men som ingen riktigt känner.

Spela utåt: Du prioriterar spelupplevelsen i kontakt med andra, hur andra agerar och reagerar mot din roll, hur din roll agerar på händelser. Exempel: vaktkaptenen som hela tiden konfronteras, tar folk till fånga, genomför förhör, skickar ut patruller i skogen.

Spelscen: En term som beskriver en kortare eller längre stund av lajvet då något ska hända/spelas ut. Kan vara mer eller mindre planerad i förväg av arrangörer, spelare eller en kombination av dessa som kommit överens om att vissa saker ska ske. Ofta är scenerna mer allmänna och kan upplevas av många på lajvet, men kan också planeras in av enstaka spelare för att spelas ut privat. Exempel: Ett bröllop mellan två spelare, ett förhör, en fin middag.

Under en spelscen är det oartigt att “avbryta” eller förstöra scenen, om man inte i förväg kommit överens om att det kan hända. Exempel: älskaren som fått en intrig om att förhindra bröllopet, spionen som hittat nycklarna till fängelset där den som ska förhöras är inlåst, tjänaren som fått ok offlajv på att förstöra middagen genom att spilla på en viss person.

Fördelen med en spelscen är att den kan planeras för att ge så bra upplevelse som möjligt, för så många som möjligt. Nackdelen är att för många scener på rad skapar en känsla av passiva/aktiva spelare på lajvet, där vissa får huvudroller medan andra får uppleva händelserna passivt. Alla arrangörer använder sig inte av förplanerade scener.

Foto från Skuggsagor 2020, en i efterhand återskapad spelscen

Spelyta mot andra spelare: Här syftar jag inte på en fysisk yta, utan de speltekniska möjligheter som finns för en lajvare/en grupp. Ju bredare yta, desto fler intriger, kontakter, möjligheter har en grupp för att hitta roligt spel. Exempel smal spelyta: Rövargruppen är fördrivna från byn, och kan nu bara smyga in på natten för att stjäla saker. Exempel bred spelyta: Rövargruppen är fördrivna från byn, men har en spion som är dräng. Dessutom förklär sig två till köpmän för att smuggla in vapen i byn, medan en annan mutar vaktkaptenen som den är syskon med. De rekryterar också två missnöjda bönder som rövare.

Arrangörer gör det största jobbet med att fördela och skapa spelyta genom att bestämma vilka grupper som passar in på lajvet, vilka de ska ha kopplingar till och skriva intriger. Men spelare kan också skapa större yta genom att i förväg planera kontakter med andra spelare, bjuda in till spel genom förslag (inlajv och offlajv). Det här är en spelteknik som man lär sig som spelare- ju längre du har lajvat desto fler bra spelexempel får du uppleva.

Döda spel: Var inte en sådan som dödar spelet för andra! Säg “ja, men” istället för nej. Exempel: Du förstår offlajv att planen är en dålig idé men gör den ändå för roligt spel. Exempel 2: Det vore logiskt för din roll att döda en annan roll, men det dödar spel för den personen så istället slår du ned denne/hotar den så den håller tyst. Här kommer också nästa nivå av att inte döda spel: att bemöta det sistnämnda med hån/likgiltighet/våld eller liknande “icke-reaktion” är respektlöst- spela istället med eller kom på en ännu roligare idé. Eller om det låser sig; gå offlajv diskret och förklara din spelidé för den andra.

Spela ned andra: Inte heller en rolig grej att göra. Exempel: att inte visa respekt för adel/kunglighet fast det vore logiskt att göra det. Att inte vara rädd för andras vapen/vapenhot, att inte följa med i maktspel oavsett om man spelar mot de med lägre inlajvstatus eller högre inlajvstatus. Vill spelaren som är din tjänare vara rädd för dig; spela så hotfull som du orkar/vill. Vill spelaren som spelar kung att andra ska bli imponerade; bli det så mycket du orkar. Ofta kan det kännas roligt att spela ned andra eftersom det direkt ger en känsla av status och framgång offlajv, men speltekniskt är det inte speciellt schysst.

Spela upp andra: Motsatsen till ovan, förstås. Du blir imponerad av de som spelar högre statusroller än dig, du blir besegrad av de som spelar skickligare i vapenbruk än dig, du blir lurad av de som spelar lurendrejjare (till en viss gräns, de måste förstås fortfarande göra ett bra försök). Spela upp andra kan man också göra i den egna gruppen: när vakterna är med i en strid blir du själv passiv, när besökare är där beordrar du runt dina tjänare, när den vise talar tystnar alla uppmärksamt. Skapar ofta energi, dynamik och en känsla av bjudighet.

Spela MED andra lajvare: att spela i en grupp, tillsammans mot ett inlajvmål. Eller; att möta och följa upp spel för att skapa mer spel för fler. Exempelvis gå med på att bli lurad, tillfångatagen, rånad eller liknande händelser som Inlajv inte för en närmare inlajvmålet, men som Speltekniskt ger roliga upplevelser. Exempel: Tjuven blir tillfångatagen, men lurar vakterna så att den lyckas undkomma (tjuven spelar med vakterna, vakterna bjuder tillbaka) bara för att snubbla på en annan spelares stav och hamna i bråk (tjuven bjuder in fler i spelscenen, som följer upp spelet) tills vakterna fängslar tjuven igen.

Spela MOT andra lajvare: att spela mot andra lajvare med andra inlajvmål, att försöka vinna, att vara fiender. Eller; att möta spel genom att presentera eget spel/andra förslag. Exempel: Tjuven blir nästan tillfångatagen, men vill offlajv hellre gå och äta. Erbjuder vakterna en muta som blir nöjda och går därifrån. (offlajvanledning). Exempel 2: Tjuven blir nästan tillfångatagen, men vill hellre klara sin intrig genom att leverera guldet till en annan grupp. Springer fortare/lovar vakterna en tjänst/lovar att stjäla något åt dem senare (intriganledning).

foto smygtaget inlajv under Nordanil; Profeten

Nu har du fått en massa speltekniska termer förklarade, och därigenom också olika sätt att spela på. De olika sätten att spela har ingen inbördes rangordning, det är inte bättre eller sämre att spela inåt än utåt osv (förutom att döda spelet då, gör inte det), men för att skapa bra lajvupplevelser är det bra om du som lajvare 1. känner till de olika möjligheterna och 2. vet vilka spelsätt du föredrar och förmedlar dem till arrangörerna och din ev grupp. Som arrangör krävs en bredare överblick; ett lajv blir speltekniskt bra och roligt om de flesta grupper har mycket spelyta, tillgång till spelscener, och grupperna består av en mix av aktiva och reaktiva spelare där ledarna i gruppen är skickliga på att spela Med andra lajvare.

Med det här sagt, så blir ju ändå de flesta lajv bättre med någon typ av antagonist. Om alla är bjussiga spelare som säger “ja, men” hela tiden finns en risk att Alla lyckas och blir bästa vänner, och även om det skapar en mysig känsla kanske arrangörerna hade tänkt sig ett skräcklajv. Som antagonist kan du gå in, säga nej, vara till besvär eller sätta upp mål för spelare att ta sig över, men det är också många gånger ett tungt spel. Som arrangör är det klokt att kontrollera vilka grupper/spelare som vill spela på det här sättet innan man fördelar intriger, eller använda sig av SLPstyrkor som antagonister (monster, rövare, onda ledare osv).

Om du har en grupp att spela med, oavsett om det är en kompisgrupp eller en grupp för dig okända, så kan också de här termerna hjälpa er att prata om vilken typ av lajv ni vill ha, hur ni ska spela mot varandra och hitta likasinnade att dela lajvupplevelsen med.

Och slutligen; vinna lajvet. Term som ibland används om att lyckas med sin intrig utan problem, att inlajv uppnå alla sina mål. Men som egentligen betyder: Att ha roligast, att bidra till att andra spelare har det roligt (tortyr, förhör och fångenskap kan ju också vara roligt…) och samtidigt spela ut sina intriger. Ut och vinn lajvet nu!

(är du nybörjare och vill veta mer om lajv? Den här länken innehåller många bra tips. Tänk på att olika saker gäller på olika arrangemang, så kolla gärna varje lajvs förutsättningar också)


Leave a comment

Medieval pattens (research post)

I wanted to buy myself a pair of really nice wooden pattens to protect my handmade medieval shoes during events, like 6 years ago. I didn’t find any, so then I tried to trade for a pair with some woodworking friends, but non knew how to make a pair or didn’t want to, so I set out to fix my non-pattens-problem on my own. That took a while; and believe me, I have gone through some bad options before I ended up happy.

patinor

Making a wooden sole with a leather strap, and then put it on your foot seems like a simple task, but in the end I didn’t get it right before I researched the extant finds, looked at artwork and then tried making a pair with some serious hands-on experimenting. I wanted them to both look good, feel right and be comfortable to move in. Now I have finally made a pair I am satisfied with, so I wanted to share my research and process with you! Because of the amount of research, text and pictures I ended up with, I am splitting the posts into research and step-by-step. Easier to read!

Period: Europe, mainly 14th to 15th century.

About pattens

Pattens are a pair of soles with straps, to wear with your everyday medieval shoe to raise the foot above the ground, avoiding snow, dirt and water. Though they might look like sandals their purpose was to protect the wearer and the expensive shoes all year around, and the thick soles meant you came up from the ground, keeping you dry and warm as well as making the shoes last longer. Pattens were shaped after the foot and the leather shoe, changing form as the shoe fashion did.

They may also be referred to as clogs or galoshes, all names for a medieval overshoe meant to protect the leather shoe, though I will use the term pattens like Grew and Neergaard does in Shoes and Pattens. There are finds of pattens from the 12th and 13th century, making them an useful accessory for the medieval person. Finds of 14th century pattens in London are often decorated for the higher classes, and gets more common later in the century. In the 15th century they become increasingly popular, with many different models and variations. Lots of extant finds show this trend, as well as the pattens being frequently showed in contemporary art. Based on this knowledge, I decided to focus mainly on the late 14th and 15th century variations of pattens.

Materials and models

Pattens can be found with soles in joined layers of leather, as well as wood, and with a solid sole or a two-pieced variant, joined with leather almost like a hinge. Examples with a wooden platform on top of stilts or wedges in wood or metal can also be found.

Examples of wood being used in finds; alder, willow, poplar and one example of beech. Aspen was prohibited for use in England in 1416 (which tells us it was probably a popular choise) but 1464 it was stated that it was allowed to make pattens of aspen wood not suitable for arrowshafts (Shoes and Pattens).

15th and early 16th century pattens, both wood and layers of leather was used for soles.

Straps made of leather

All extant examples I have studied have straps made of leather (vegetable tanned cowhide seems to be the choice), though there are lots of different strap fastenings. Some pattens have one strap over the front part of the foot, almost like flip flops, while others also have straps at the sides or behind the heel, joining in a strap around the ankle. The heel straps can be first seen in late 14th century finds.

Looking at contemporary artwork, many working persons from the period wear practical pattens with a sturdy strap over the foot, while higher classes have more formed soles with delicate straps, sometimes decorated, and sometimes with a buckle.

To adjust the fit of the straps there are examples of metal buckles, ties and leather strips secured with a piece of leather or a nail among other varieties. The leather used for straps are generally thinner than the one used to join a split sole, and to make it sturdier a seam, a binding or a folded edge have been used. Two layers of leather sewn together is another method. The leather could be decorated with dyes or edges of contrasting colours and stamps or cut outs in patterns.

To fasten the leather to the soles iron nails were used, both for the straps and the sole hinge. Sometimes a second leather strap was nailed down around the sole to finish of the look and protect the foot straps from wear. Other words used for the nails are dubs, pins and pegs but I choose to follow the item descriptions on the online database of the Museum of London naming them nails. It also seems that the medieval examples have the same shape and size as nails to other kinds of work.

pattens2

Metal buckles and other fastenings

There are several examples of metal buckles represented in artwork on pattens from the 15th century, and finds from the 14th and 15th century of similar buckles made in iron, brass, bronze and copper allow to mention some examples. Because most buckles are found loose it is hard to say which ones was used for belts, shoes, pattens and purses. I opted for some examples from contemporary artwork to show you, and if you want to further examine buckles from the period there are lots of finds on online museum collections as well as in Dress Accessories.

Examples of metal buckles in contemporary artwork

There are several finds from sites in Europe like London and Amsterdam as well as examples from Germany. If you want to see more extant finds, Museum of London online collection is a great source to begin with.

Hugo van der Goes, The Portinari Altarpiece/Triptych, c 1475

Sources:

Grew and Neergaard (2001) Shoes and pattens p. 91-101

Egan and Pritchard (2002) Dress Accessories 1150-1450

Goubitz (2011) Stepping Through Time: archaeological footwear from prehistoric times until 1800.

Museum of London online collection (20200416) https://collections.museumoflondon.org.uk/online/search/#!/results?terms=medieval%20patten

Extant find at the top; Museum of London online collection. 15th c patten in wood with leather and iron nails.

A patten maker; (20200416) https://hausbuecher.nuernberg.de/75-Amb-2-317-106-v

patinor2


1 Comment

Living at Birka

IMG_5639

In the beginning of August I took my camp equipment and moved to Björkön for a long viking-weekend. I had such a wonderful time, and wanted to show you some great photos and inspire you to maybe travel there yourself, when the world allows.

As many of you fellow viking-nerds know, Björkö was the place were the viking city Birka was situated, and it is very beautifully situated outside Stockholm, in Mälaren (so it is in the inner archipelago, not towards the sea) which makes for a great climate. Wild apples and cherry trees grows over the island, and sheep grass the ancient hills, grave mounds and ancient monuments still visible from the viking era.

There are still lots of grave mounds left as they were, but also a museum, a newly built experimental viking village with boats tied to it’s pier, and good paths to stroll to different sites on the island. As you can imagine, I got quite excited when asked to join some friends there!


When the sun set, we took a stroll around the pasture lands, enjoying the view over the water and the surrounding islands, with a small picnic basket with us. The path took us over viking age grave mounds, past the Black Earth (were the city Birka was situated) and toward the Homelands. When darkness came, we returned to the village to lit a fire, and enjoy the company of each other.

The village is built as an experimental viking settlement which allows a viking group to actually live in the houses, tend the gardens and the buildings, as well as sleep, cook and go around their daily life there- as well as greeting modern visitors during the day time. Not everything is 100% accurate with what we know about the daily viking life, but things get mended, rebuilt and used in a historical way, with old tools and knowledge (but modern safety measures…)

It was so cozy going around the settlement, with the sound of cooking and woodworking, the smell of fire and tar, and vikings going around their day tending to their business. I brought my market stall and tent, setting it up with a nice view over the water, were I spent some time drinking coffe and chatting about all things viking age. I also held a lecture about clothing and dress in the viking society, inside the interesting museum on site

My friends Joel and Josefin took me on a guided tour since they hade been here before, and we went to see the excavations going on near the shore a short walk away. This was so interesting and I learned a lot about archeology (which seems to be such a hard job, working on your knees for hours, patiently digging through the ground.) It was also very clear how much the field has developed since the early reports, that we base much of our understanding on when recreating viking age. I look forward to the reports from this excavation!

Outfit of the day; linen shift, apron dress in woolen diamond twill inspired by the Köstrup find, woolen shawl and tortoise brooches to fasten the outfit with.

In the photo below, I just have the blue dress and loose hair, feeling a bit undressed, but also happy to finally be cool enough…

I spent the days in the market stall selling some viking things, or strolling around with new friends in the museum, out in the landscape or by the fire. This was just what I needed after a summer of staying-at-home, and even though we weren’t many it felt really good to be outside again, doing things I love.

If you want to know more about how to visit Birka, here’s a link with useful info, there’s some lovely boat trips during the summer which will let you stay to see the interesting bits and take a swim before going back.


2 Comments

Early 14th century outfit

IMG_5536

This is my early 14th century outfit, hand stitched and made with inspiration from medieval manuscript sources, like the Luttrell Psalter from early 14th c England.

I made the dress for my video project and wanted to put together a whole outfit that would fit in the same time period. It turned out super comfy, maybe I could wear it instead of my comfy pants indoors..?

I also made it so it would be usable in the viking outfit if I would be in need of a thin woolen dress/kirtle under the apron dress. Hence the looser sleeves, shorter length and not so wide neckline. It is certainly not the most fashionable 14th c outfit, rather an outfit for work, like in my market stall. (Uhum, much suitable, very nice thinking there…)

IMG_5533

This dress will be featured in my online lecture about Medieval Dress (only in Swedish right now!) and as I know that many of you readers are Swedes or understand Swedish, I will post a link to the lecture here. For you non-Swedish speakers; I have not forgot you, and will strive to translate interesting parts of the video to English and post it on a Youtube channel in the future.

dress

Until then, here’s a list of the materials used in the outfit if you get interested in making your own.

What items do you need?

For my outfit in size small-medium, based on fabrics 150 cm width

  • Linen shift, 2 meters. Linen thread and bees wax for sewing.
  • Wool kirtle as the visible layer. 2,6-3 meters of wool fabric. Wool, linen or silk thread for sewing.
  • Birgitta cap + linen half circle veil. 60 cm thin linen. Thin linen thread and bees wax.
  • Linen apron. 100*80 cm of sturdy linen, linen thread and bees wax.
  • Wool hose/socks. Around 70*100 cm wool twill.
  • Leather turn shoes.
  • Garters in wool or silk for the hose. Fabric scraps, vowen ribbons or braids can be used.
  • Purse, here in brick stitched silk with silk tassels and a silk tablet woven band. Made by my friend Jenny!
  • Thin belt in leather or fabric.
  • Decorative brooch in brass with stones.
  • 3 dress pins in bronze.

14thcoutfit


4 Comments

Things you can do at home

With the world as it is today with covid outbreaks everywhere, a lot of us finds ourself at home, more or less bored and without our usual friends and pastimes. I know it may feel uncertain and depressing to not know how the world will be in a few weeks, months or even half a year. But instead of feeling down, I will do my best to lighen your mood and as a handcrafter, I will shamelessly take this opportunity to inspire you all to more handcrafting!

handcraftedhistorygore

I mean, lots of time (and internet) on our hands, and a season to look forward to with magical events, cozy markets, lots of friends… (Yes, I know it might be a late season, but the world will rotate back sooner or later.)

So, look at these photos- don’t you get inspired? Longing for some summer vibes?

 

What are your goals for this season? Do you need to update or mend your wardrobe? Or make some practical changes to your camping gear? Here’s all my shifts washed, mended and ironed. Ready for fun adventures! (Also, welcome to a photo of some sexy medieval lingerie. It is here you’ll get all the tastiness!)

IMG_3857

I have a long list of things I need to do before buying fabric or planning new projects. As I wrote the list in New Years, I kind of felt that I would Never Get It Done. But now, being home full time without any extra jobs, markets and uh, well…income I have decided To Get Things Done. Yes, all the things! Some serious sewing will happen in this home the coming weeks.

If you need more inspiration to get started, or know what to make, here’s some really good tips:

  • Pinterest might be full of advertisement, photos and medieval-ish things but there’s really good inspiration too. My favourite is to search for different artists or painters from the period I want to know more about, or for earlier periods search for different finds, like “Birka graves viking” and see what comes up. Pinterest will show you more of the things you click on and save, so as you go along you will find more and more. Check out were the sources come from, follow others with lots of good folders and get inspired!
  • Go through your historical wardrobe and sort things out. Clean/air, mend and iron things to make them look neat. Try them on if you feel like it, play, get inspired! Think back to the previous season- did everything work? Was those shoes comfy? Need to make adjustments to any garment or sew a new warmer one?

IMG_3859Mending might be boring, but feels great when it is done!

  • Sell things you don’t need or like. The second hand market for reenactor wear is large and you can find lots of groups on facebook for buying and selling things. Get rid of things from your wardrobe you don’t like, get some new money, use the money to make more things you really love!
  • Get yourself outside! No, I didn’t mean exercise, but even if there’s no historical events right now you can gear yourself up and bring a friend out for some fun playing time. Take photos of your outfit in the forest, go for a hike, or cook over an open fire for lunch. Share all those photos on social media and get new energy! (also, going out with your gear makes you see if everything’s working well or if you need to make adjustments.)

vikingclothingWarm and comfortable viking, ready for a cold event!

  • Get yourself some new handcrafting things! With more time on your hands, you will have time for a really fun and inspirational project. (No, you don’t need to make all those boring things first, sometimes it is more important to get new joy before being practical.) Also, you purchasing new fabrics, threads, tools etc from small businesses will make all the different for them now when many are struggeling with survival due to canceled markets etc.
  • And if you don’t feel like sewing everything for the coming season- consider ordering a new garment (pick the one you felt would be boring to make yourself) from your favourite business. It will support them, you will get a new fun garment, and new inspiration for the coming season.

IMG_2200

(Hey; remember that I have lots of free tutorials for you here on the blog? And also, on my Patreon you can access all my tutorials for a good deal that I also sell on Etsy. This is kind of a commercial for my own stuff you know. Buy some stuff!)

And remember that even if you can’t go out to fun meetings and events all those lovely people are just a few clicks away, so why not start a sewing circle with skype, join a fb group or facetime with your friends while handcrafting! Spread the joy and happiness- handcraft more!