Handcrafted History

Historical and modern handcraft mixed with adventures


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Medieval wedding dress

I’m in the process of making my wedding dresses, which will be from the late 15th century.

Of course I want a nice looking wedding dress, but at the same time I want to be able to wear the dress on more occasions than the wedding. So I wont be having a pure white dress, since that is really unpractical. Instead, I have bought some lovely green (yes, I know I already have that green shade on several garments…) wool, a darker green velvet and a creme coloured silk fabric. This combination will be the wedding dresses, but it’s hard to decide exactly want I want to do.

But I have started with the basic dress in the creamy silk (or is it more like ivory perhaps?) cutting out the skirt and drafting the pattern. Now I have a bunch of orders to tend to, but after that I’m planning to sew wedding clothes only for a couple of weeks!

I also plan to make H a new outfit fot the wedding. We will match, of course, so I’m looking at the late 15th century and planning a doublet in silk (see below), hose in black wool, and an outer garment made of the same green wool that I bought for myself. The shirt will be in white linen or silk.

Anyway; I’ve made a pinterest folder with some inspiration and the different fabrics I’ve bought; https://www.pinterest.se/handcraftedhist/medieval-wedding-ideas/

If you have any input on design or practicality- feel free to send me a note here or on facebook!

Spara


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Fencing event & new outfit

Our local SCA group Gyllengran had a fencing event some time ago, a pleasant and small event- perfect to warm you up before the real event season starts. We who weren’t fencing gathered in the big common room for handcraft, small talk and cookies with wine.

Here’s some pictures from the event, and on my new 16th century outfit. I actually gave the indoor light a chance for pictures, but naw… I’m longing for outdoor events.

Warm and cozy with the fur lined gollar, comfy and easy to wear due to the well fitted bodice and the shorter skirt.

I’m wearing a straight unbleached linen shift closest to my body, and on top of that a simple yellow wool kirtle, without sleeves. It’s laced in the side and well fitted, so it works like a bra.

On top of that I wear my brown woolen over dress, which is based on paintings from Germany from around 1530-1550, mostly on peasants and simple workers. The pattern construction is from the book Drei Schnittbucher, which consists of tailor manuscriphts.

Over it is a handwoven smocked linen apron, a version of the st Birgitta cap (tutorial is out for sale) and last my rabbit fur lined gollar, which is based on paintings from the period. For work, only the Birgitta cap is used, but going out or getting fancy means another weil or two is pinned on top of the cap.

I also wear woolen hose, tied under the knee with wool straps, and a pair of simple leather shoes- much like you can se during the 14th-15th century. It seems cowmouth shoes were only for landsknechts and their followers and people of higher class, wereas the commoners used sturdy leather boots that reached above the ankle.

The belt is my old simple leather belt and fits well enough, but I’m planning to upgrade to a more 16th century one. The rosary and bag is a bit fancy for the rest of the outfit, but I liked the red colour on top of the brown dress- a little party fanciness to bling a simple workers outfit.

Now, a little mending of a seam and some improvements awaits the outfit before the season begin. New clothes are always the most fun to work with!

Spara