Handcrafted History

Historical and modern handcraft mixed with adventures


2 Comments

Tutorial Apron Dress

One of the dresses that I still like after using for many events, is my viking age apron dress (it’s actually one of my oldest piece of historical clothing). It´s made of a tabby woven wool and the construction of the dress is inspired by the find from Hedeby. The pattern is made by 4 pieces and is quite simple, you´ll achieve the fitted look by making small adjustments according to your body.
As you probably already noticed, there are amazingly many different variations of reconstructions and suggestions on how the skirts may have looked, and I also think there were different variants during the viking age. However, I decided to imitate the find from Hedeby, as this has a piece of a probable seam preserved, and gives a suggestion of how the skirts/panels may have been assembled. After reading some discussions on the website Historiska världar and looking at gold figurines, I also chose to do it with a trail, with overly long skirts. That’s my interpretation of the trail on the figurines and picture stones and I was curious about how the fabric would fall with such a model. After a while, however, I cut off the excess fabric that made the overly long skirt, since I got irritated about the trail dragging mud everywhere and getting in my way. It was a nice view though, the long skirt trailing behind.

hängselkjol2

Here is a list of what you need, and some easy steps to follow to make one of your own!

What you need:

  • 2-3 m *1.5 m fabric (2 m= small, 3 m=large)
  • scissor
  • measuring tape
  • markers for fabric
  • pins
  • needle and thread or a sewing machine
  • a friend to assist with the final adjustments on the dress

The measurements you need:

  • Armpit-hemd (3) (as long as you want the dress to be) + 3 cm sewing allowance at the bottom, and 5 cm at the top if you would like to make the dress with the higher look (like my green one) when measuring from the armpit; start as high up as you can get under the arm. you will cut out space for your arms movement later.
  • Width around your body (1) (the widest part of your body, often around your chest/over the breasts. Divide this measurement in 4 and then add 4cm to each piece (seam allowance and leisure of movement)
  • Armpit-waist (2) (in this case, your waist is your slimmest part of your body, after which the dress is going to get wider)

I chose to make my dress rather figure close, but a more loose style will make it possible to wear a pair of underdresses under it, which can be nice during colder weather. The dress is built by 4 pieces of the same size and shape. They start out straight and then gets wider at the waist.

The amount of fabric you need depends on your measurements, but I drafted up three different ways of putting your pattern pieces out on your fabric, depending on how much fabric you want to use.

For the draft to work you need to have a fabric that is 150 cm in width, and that you doesn’t need a longer dress than that. 1F + 2F is the two side pieces, 3B + 4B is the front and back ones. The bottom-left draft shows how you can use the fabric in an effective way by doing a gore in one panel.

The upmost pattern takes 250 cm of fabric, and gives you a dress lining of 80cm *4= 320 cm. You can absolutely do with less; the one at the bottom- right gives you a lining of about 270 cm, using just under 200 cm of fabric. This is for a small-medium sized person. If you have a larger size, remember to add width not just to your upper area but to the skirt as well, to make the dress drape nicely and give you space to move.

After cutting the pieces from the fabric (but before you cut them after your figure) you will want to bast them together in order to try the size and fitting. The dotted lines on the picture above indicates were you can make the dress a little bit figure close (waist/under the breasts, under the armpit and at the back). When you try out the dress, remember to have your shift/dresses underneath so it wont get to small. If you’re using a modern bra during your viking adventures, then also wear it during fitting sessions.

When the dress is done, I usually make the straps in the same wool fabric as I made the dress itself. Make them as narrow bands (folded double) and sew them on to the back of your dress at the same position as your bra straps would be- this will make them lay comfortable on your shoulders. In the front you may sew them down to the dress if you haven’t got tortoise brooches yet, otherwise use these to fasten the straps to the dress. I prefer to do a loop at the end of the strap, and then another one at the front of the dress; these you can clearly see in finds from the viking age, and it also makes it easier to use the brooches without damaging your fabric.

If you want, decorations is a nice way to spice up your apron dress. A tablet woven band, a small piece of silk fabric or a silver thread posament is find-based decorations from the viking age. Good luck with your sewing!

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara


Leave a comment

The easy apron dress

This apron dress is really simple and easy to sew together- perfect if you want to save fabric, try to hand stitch your garment, or just want to try out a looser fit on an apron dress.

 The description is based on the fact that you have a fabric that is approximately 150 cm wide, and the dress in the picture is about 130 cm long. If your fabric width is different, you will have to redraw the pattern pieces and probably piece the dress together with more gores. I show you a way to make the skirt fuller with a small gore on the drawing below. The method can be used for larger gores also. B = back of the dress, F = front.
Customize the measurements according to your own measurements. The amount of fabric you need depends on your measurements + how long skirt you want. On the pattern diagram, 1 square = 10 cm, so it takes 2.2m of fabric to make the dress to my measurements. Draw a separate sketch of checked paper before you begin so you will understand how the pieces are connected and laid out!
This description is mostly about the pattern-making assembly. If you want to know more about seams and techniques, check out my other descriptions and tips on the blog here.

First calculate your measurements, and draw the pattern on checked paper. The dress consists of an entire front piece (F), and a two-piece back piece (B) that is laid out on folded fabric. To get some extra fullness in the dress lining you can cut it according to the suggestion in the picture (the back piece is then cut in the bottom with a small gore).

Measure around the bust/widest part of the chest = the measurements on the narrowest part of the dress: split the measure in two to make the front and back. Remember to add seam allowance; 1-2 cm on each side. The measures on the pattern is approximately 90 cm (40 cm on the front and 50 cm on the back piece). Because the dress does not start in the middle of the bust, but a bit above, you get enough space to move and dress/undress easily.

The length of the dress; measure from the armpit and as far down as you want the dress to go. Add seam allowance of about 4 cm. In the picture the pieces are 130 cm long. The width of the dress lining becomes 2 * the total width of the fabric so 2 * 150 = 300 cm.

Once you have cut out your pieces, you can first sew the back piece in the middle, then sew on gores if you made any. Bast the front and back together and try; cut out a little for the armpit if you want, and mark with pins where your straps should be attached (I usually like to wear them on the same position where I have my bra straps, I guess my shoulders are used to that.)

Sew the sides together, press and fold the seams, whip stitch them, and finish of the linings by folding them once (on a thicker fabric) or twice (on a more light weight fabric) and whip stitch them. Finish with sewing on thin fabric straps (I usually fold mine twice towards each other, whip stitch them together and then sew them on the garment. Then you are finished!

I really recommend buying a light weight, more loose woven fabric for this dress. Sturdier wools will not fall as nice, and might feel like you move around inside a tent-like garment…

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara

Spara


Leave a comment

Enkel hängselkjol

Åh, äntligen en ny tutorial! Efter att tredje vännen frågat hur jag gjort min nya hängselkjol (som inte är så ny längre, den är nästan två år) så fick jag äntligen energi till att göra den här beskrivningen. Konstruktionen är verkligen superenkel, bekväm och tygeffektiv. Perfekt till dig som vill spara tyg, sy för hand eller bara göra en lösare hängselkjol.

Beskrivningen bygger på att du har ett tyg som är ca 150 cm brett, och kjolen på bilden blir ca 130 cm lång. Anpassa måtten efter dina egna mått. Tygmängden som går åt beror på dina mått + hur lång kjol du vill ha. På bilden är 1 ruta = 10 cm, så det går alltså åt 2,2 m tyg till mina mått. Rita ut en egen skiss på rutat papper innan du börjar så kommer du förstå hur bitarna hänger ihop!

Den här beskrivningen utgår mest från den mönstertekniska hopsättningen- om du vill veta mer om sömmar och tekniker kan du kika på mina andra beskrivningar och sytips här på bloggen =)

Räkna först ut dina mått, och rita upp mönstret på rutat papper. Hängselkjolen består av ett helt framstycke, och ett tvådelat bakstycke som läggs ut lite omlott på dubbelvikt tyg. För att få lite extra vidd i kjolen så kan du skarva den enligt förslaget på bilden (bakstycket är alltså skarvat i nederkant med en liten kil).

Mått runt bysten/bredaste delen av bröstkorgen=måttet på kilens smalaste del: dela i två och fördela på bak och framstycke. Kom ihåg att lägga till sömsmån. På bilden är måttet ca 90 cm (40 cm på framstycket och 50 cm på bakstycket). Eftersom hängselkjolen inte börjar mitt på bysten, utan en bit ovanför, får du vidd nog till att röra dig och ta på/av kjolen enkelt.

Längd på kjolen; mät från armhålan och så långt ned du vill att kjolen ska gå. Lägg till sömsmån på ca 4 cm. På bilden är styckena 130 cm långa.

Kjolfållens vidd blir 2*tygets totala bredd så 2*150=300 cm.

När du har klippt ut dina bitar så kan du först skarva bakstycket mitt i, sedan sy på ev kilar i nederkanten. Tråckla ihop fram och bakstycket med varandra och prova; klipp ur lite för armhålan om du vill och markera var hängslen ska fästas.

Sy ihop sidorna, fäll sömmarna och fålla alla kanter. Avsluta med att sy på hängslen- klart!

Spara


3 Comments

Sy en hängselklänning/hängselkjol

26 februari 2014

Ett av de plagg som jag även efter en tids användande är väldigt nöjd med är min gröna hängselkjol (eller hängselklänning) i tuskaftsvävd grön ull. Mönstret är inspirerat efter ett fynd från Hedeby och består av fyra paneler. Jag hade en mörkgrå och en brun sedan tidigare, och ville nu variera mig lite och har letat runt mycket på olika sidor som diskuterat fyndmaterial och olika tolkningar.

hängselkjol2

Som ni säkert redan lagt märke till så finns fantastiskt många olika varianter av rekonstruktioner och förslag på hur kjolarna kan ha sett ut, och jag tror också att det fanns olika varianter. Jag bestämde mig dock för att efterlikna fyndet från Hedeby, då denna har lite av en trolig söm bevarad och ger ett förslag på hur kjolarna kan ha varit hopsydda. Efter att ha läst lite diskussioner på Historiska Världar och tittat på guldgummor valde jag också att göra den hellång; det är min tolkning av släpet och jag är nyfiken på hur tyget kommer att falla med en sådan modell. Efter ett tag kortade jag dock av kjolen- släp är inte min grej utan jag snubblar mest på dem.

Här kommer en kort sömnadsbeskrivning för dig som vill göra en egen!

Du behöver:

  • 2-3 m *1.5 m tyg (2 m= small, 3 m=large)
  • sax
  • linjal, måttband
  • tygpenna
  • knappnålar
  • symaskin/nål/tråd
  • en kompis som provar in klänningen på dig

Ta sedan följande mått på dig:

  • Armhåla-längd på kjolen + 3 cm sömsmån nedtill och 5 cm upptill (högre modell) (med armhåla menar jag så långt upp i leden du kan komma, ärmhålet klipper du ut sist för att få en bekväm form
  • Bredd runt överkroppen, /4 + 4cm till varje panel (sömsmån och rörelsevidd)
  • Längd armhåla-midja (midjan är där du är som smalast)

Jag valde att göra en figursydd, men ledig variant som tillåter ett par mellanklänningar under. Modellen består av fyra lika stora paneler som jag efter att ha klippt ut och tråcklat ihop provat in på mig, med hjälp av en kompis. Panelerna är raka upptill och börjar vidgas i midjan.

hängselkjol1

Jag ritade ut bitarna varannan upp och varannan ned, utläggningen beror på tygets bredd och din personliga längd men det här är ett enkelt sätt.

För att få en kjol i storlek 36-38 blev mina bitar ungefär: bredd upptill 26 cm, längd armhåla-midja 30 cm, bredd nedtill 68 cm. Bredden nedtill går att variera efter mängden tyg, jag använde 2 meter men ju större mängd tyg desto mer bredd nertill får du. Längden på kjolen blev 136 cm.

När du klippt ut alla delar kan du tråckla ihop dem och prova kjolen; ärmhålen behöver klippas ut på en sådan här hög modell, dessutom kan du ta in klänningen under byst, i midja och svank direkt i de fyra sömmar som finns, för att få en fin passform. Kom ihåg att prova med rätt antal klänningar och eventuell bh under! När du är nöjd syr du ihop kjolen, pressar ned sömmarna, och jämnar till kanterna. Sedan är det bara att dekorera och fålla, samt fälla sömmarna.

Fyndmaterial föreslår att dekorationer på hängselkjolar var vanligt, och speciellt upptill går det åt små mängder för att göra mycket skillnad, så sy på ett snyggt brickband eller lite sidenremsor. Hängslen provar du lättast ut genom att fästa smala sydda tygremsor med knappnålar för att hitta ett bra läge, jag tycker att de blir bekväma om du låter dem ligga i linje med tänkta bh-band. Sy fast remsorna på insidan av kjolen baktill, fram fäster du dem med ett par spännbucklor, eller syr fast dem även här om du saknar sådana.

 

hängselkjol3