Handcrafted History

Historical and modern handcraft mixed with adventures


Lästips; 1400talsdräkt för kvinnan

Because the book is in Swedish; so will this blogpost be. It is about a new book about the late 15th century clothing for women.

Kommer ni ihåg att jag skrev om mansdräktsboken förut? Nu har även kvinnoboken kommit ut, och jag ville förstås bläddra i den också!

Boken påminner mycket om mansdräkten med samma lättöverskådliga layout, enkel och tydlig text, och stycken som efter en snabb genomgång ger dig koll på dräkten. Det är den typen av bok jag skulle börja med att skaffa om jag ville göra 1400tal, eller ge till en nybörjare som vet *ingenting* men gärna vill vara med. Det sena 1400talet är en komplex period med många samexisterande stilar och plagg, men jag tycker ändå att det känns som att den ger en överblick över det tyska modet, även om det inte finns plats för så många sömnadstekniska detaljer som jag skulle vilja- det är ju trots allt mitt intresse =)

Boken innehåller, förutom referenslistor, också massor av bilder från perioden. Bredvid varje avsnitt om plagg/material osv hittar du alltså både historiska referenser, bilder, skisser och materialförslag från ett modernt perspektiv. Dessutom finns ett uppslag om hur du får till 1400talslooken med en “turbanslöja”, jag förutspår att det här kommer vara nya innestilen till sommaren…


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The wardrobe of your dream

On of the things I like best with making garments to others is when I can help them to get their dream-outfit. You know- that dreamy perfect dress, the really cool adventure gear or that really well fitted medieval outfit that makes you feel like a king or queen. Every year I sew a fair amount of clothes by order, and some more that I make as experiments (like this dress) and then sell after using them a couple of times to check the pattern construction and how it works in real life.

But I also help others with sewing that perfect-dreamy-outfit, and a couple of weeks ago I met Elin and helped her out with her beautiful dress project.

If you are new at sewing or doesn’t know where to start, a little help in the beginning with pattern drafting, cutting and fitting can make all the different. I also like to share all my best sewing tip and tricks, even thou sometimes people prefer to maybe not hear “nah, you’ll have to iron that first” or “it will be much better if you pin all those small parts to each other” when they have that really really good idea they want to try Right Now. But in the end, working in the right order makes a garment that is well done and beautiful, and also makes the job easier…

I’m planning a weekend sewing workshop for all of you who would like to start with a new and awesome project, but may not know where to begin. Kepp a look out!

If you live far away and might be in need for sewing tips or help, you can search my blog for “sytips” or choose the category “bra tips” and run them through google translate, it will give you some of my best tips. Also, you’re welcome to email me or comment here on this blog, and I will try to help you as soon as I got time.

Good luck with your sewing!




Which tool’s do I need for sewing?

This is my favourite tools for making medieval garments.


Fabric scissor, paper scissor, thread scissor. Use your best scissor for your good fabrics, and the paper scissor for toile fabric, paper patterns and everything that is not so important. A small thread scissor is easy to bring along and spares the other two from to much carrying around (and laying around the house were other family members may find them)

Measure tape, long ruler and a small measure stick (in Swedish mätsticka, sömometer or fifficus). The long ruler (or just a straight stick) is very useful when drawing out long lines on the fabric. I have one at 100 cm, one at 60 cm and a couple of shorter ones, but 100 cm is best if you have to pick one. The small measure stick is very practical for folding edges, putting on trims or details and adding seam allowance to your pieces.

Fabric chalk for drawing out your pieces on the fabric.

Pins for holding pattern pieces toghether or marking things out without chalk (for example) and sewing needles of different sizes- I like to sew my pieces together (running stitches) with a slightly longer needle than I use for casting edges with whip stitches.

Safety pin to pin down sewing projects (it´s easier to sew if the seam is pinned down to something)

Seam ripper- do I need to say more? Thimbleful (fingerborg) for sewing (click at this post and watch the video if you want to know how)

Threads of different materials and sizes. The lump is bee’s wax and is used for coating the linen threads when sewing. Makes them last longer.